World

Scientists Aim to Map and Save Endangered Habitats
Efforts to save endangered animals are making a difference for dozens of species.
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Ali, a baby orangutan who was found unconscious by a passerby after being overcome by smoke from burning wildfires, sits in an incubator far from his natural habitat at the Wanariset Samboja refuge center near Balikpapan in East Kalimantan on the island of Borneo, Indonesia. Logging poses a serious threat to the lowland forests on Indonesia's Borneo Island, which is home to endangered orangutans, prompting scientists to figure out how to catalog and map the world's most threatened ecosystems, just like their familiar list of endangered species. 

(AP)

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A newly-born Sumatran elephant stands with his mother only hours after its birth at Surabaya Zoo in Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia. Indonesia's endangered elephants, tigers and orangutans are threatened by shrinking habitat, which is cut and burned to make way for plantations or sold as lumber. Only 3,000 Sumatran elephants are believed to remain in the wild.

(AP2010)

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 Kessi, a young female orangutan, looks at the stump where her hand was cut off by plantation workers at an orangutan rehabilitation center in Palangkaraya, Kalimantan, Indonesia. Logging poses a serious threat to the lowland forests on Indonesia's Borneo Island that are home to endangered orangutans.

(AP)

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A boy jumps over the nearly dry Rio Grande river marking the international border between Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, and El Paso, Texas, during a severe drought. Now scientists are figuring out how to catalog and map the world's most threatened ecosystems, just like their familiar list of endangered species. 

(AP1999)

ThreatenedEcosystems

A young orangutan searches for food in a stand of dead trees completely surrounded by burned forest being cleared for palm plantations near Mantangai, Kalimantan, Indonesia. 

(AP)

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Ship graveyard near Muynak over the dried up Aral Sea in Uzbekistan. The once-vast Aral Sea between the former Soviet republics of Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan shrank by about 90 percent due to diversions of water, leaving behind a salty wasteland and abandoned fishing boats, and ruining the local economy. 

(AP2010)

Scientists Aim to Map and Save Endangered Habitats

Efforts to save endangered animals are making a difference for dozens of species.

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