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Are Tourist Flights over Nazca Safe?
Two hundred and fifty thousand people a year visit Peru's spectacular geoglyphs on the desert floor at Nazca, a UNESCO World Heritage site. The best views are from up above in the air. But is it safe? 
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The Hands

Jan. 20, 2009: According to the Peru's National Institute of Culture, the Nazca Lines, some three hundred images in total, are attributed to the pre-Inca Nazca people, who inhabited the coastal areas south of what is now Lima between the 3rd century B.C. and 7th century A.D. Pictured is the figure known as Hands.

(EFE/PROMPERÚ)

The Monkey of Curves

The figure known as The Monkey has only has two elements. One is a wide line with a stem and the other is a single uninterrupted line that creates the shape of the monkey. 

(EFE/Newscom)

The Hummingbird

The popular hummingbird, one of the original zoomorphic figures, has become an icon of Peru. It is located on an extension of the plateau, surrounded by drop-offs on three sides. Its purpose remains undefined.

(EFE/Glowimages)

October 3, 2010

A small aircraft fell to the ground, killing two crewmen and four English tourists. According to a report by Radio Programas del Perú (RPP), the crash happened ten minutes after the plane took off from María Reiche Airport.

(EFE/STR)

February 25, 2010

Police remove bodies following an accident in which three Chileans and four Peruvians died. Although weather conditions were good, the plane, a Cessna U206F, crashed while trying to make a turn in the area known as "the Turnaround of the Spider."

((((MÁXIMA CALIDAD DISPONIBLE))))

April 9, 2008

Two French tourists died when a small plane was caught up in high-tension electrical wires.

(EFE/Newscom)

Are Tourist Flights over Nazca Safe?

Two hundred and fifty thousand people a year visit Peru's spectacular geoglyphs on the desert floor at Nazca, a UNESCO World Heritage site. The best views are from up above in the air. But is it safe? 

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