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Moscow Subway Bombings
Two female homicide bombers blew themselves up on Moscow's subway system as it was jam-packed with rush-hour passengers Monday, killing at least 38 people and wounding over 100.

Chechen_Terrorist_Claims_Responsibility_a

March 31: This undated frame grab image made available by IntelCenter and taken from a video posted on a pro-rebel Web site, purports to show Chechen militant leader Doku Umarov. In the video Umarov claims responsibility for the twin suicide bombings in Moscow's subway Monday that killed 39 people.

AP Photo/IntelCenter

Funeral_for_the_Fallen

March 31: Mourners hold a picture and a cross during the funeral of Maxim Mareyev, a 20-year-old university student who was killed in Monday's suicide bombings in Moscow, in the town of Chekhov near Moscow. The twin bombings killed 39 and wounded dozens shocking Russia and the Kremlin with the return of terrorism to their everyday lives.

AP Photo/Mikhail Metzel

Donating_Blood

March 31: People donate blood at a mobile blood transfusion laboratory in Moscow on Wednesday. The Moscow subway bombings shocked a country that had grown accustomed to such violence being confined to a restive southern corner such as Dagestan, and marked the return of terrorism to the everyday lives of Muscovites after a six-year break.

AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev

Burying_the_Dead

March 31: Grigory Khoshchenko the uncle of Maxim Mareyev, a 20-year-old university student who was killed in Monday's suicide bombings in Moscow, cries on the coffin of his nephew during a funeral in the town of Chekhov near Moscow. The twin bombings killed 39 and wounded dozens shocking Russia and the Kremlin with the return of terrorism to their everyday lives. 

AP Photo/Mikhail Metzel

Moscow_Mourns

March 30: People react, at the site of the explosion at the Park Kultury subway station, in Moscow, Russia. Flowers overflowed Tuesday from rickety tables in two Moscow subway stations in memory of the 39 passengers killed in a double suicide bombing as Russia observes a national day of mourning.

AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky

Commemoration

March 30: People stand at the sight of the explosion at Park Kultury subway station in Moscow, Russia.

AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev

Service_for_the_Victims

March 30: People attend a religious service for those killed in the subway explosions at Christ the Saviour Cathedral in Moscow, Russia.

AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko

Remembering_the_Dead

March 30: Flowers seen at the Park Kultury subway station in Moscow, Russia. People put flowers in two Moscow subway stations in memory of the 39 passengers killed in a double suicide bombing as Russia observes a national day of mourning.

AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky

Candlelight_Vigil

March 30: A boy crosses himself during a religious service for those killed in subway explosions at Christ the Saviour Cathedral in Moscow, Russia.

AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko

A_Day_of_Mourning

March 30: People lay flowers at a sight of explosion at Lubyanka subway station in Moscow,Russia. 

AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky

Scene of the Blast

March 29: Passengers lie strewn on the floor of the Park Kultury subway station in Moscow just minutes after a homicide bomber set off a deadly blast -- one of a pair that rocked the Russian capital Monday morning.

AP

Terror Train

March 29: Grisly evidence of the damage wrought by a homicide bomber in Moscow's packed Lubyanka subway station, one of two that were targeted Monday morning in blasts that took 38 lives. Russian authorities have said female bombers were behind the attack.

AP

Bombed Out

March 29: A scene of devastation at Moscow's Lubyanka subway station after homicide bombers struck during the height of the morning rush hour. Russian authorities have blamed the attack on rebels from the Caucasus region, which includes Chechnya, where separatists have fought Russian forces since the mid-1990s.

AP

Map of Moscow

A map of central Moscow shows the two sites bombed Monday morning: the Lubyanka and Park Kultury subway stops.

In the Ambulance

March 29: In the hours after the attack, a man recovers outside the Park Kultury subway station in Moscow, bloodied and dazed by the events of the morning.

AP

Tending the Injured

March 29: Still shocked at the Park Kultury station. A woman wearing a belt belt packed with plastic explosives set it off as a train's doors opened during the height of morning rush hour.

AP

Back to the Phones

March 29: Returning to normal life while still bearing the marks of a brutal terrorist attack, a survivor talks on his cell phone near the exit of the Park Kultury subway stop in central Moscow.

Reuters

In the Passage

March 29: Once packed, now empty. A security camera shows bodies in the passageway of Park Kultury station in Moscow.

AP

Flooding the Scene

March 29: Lubyanka metro station, normally packed with commuters, is crowded with firefighters and rescue workers after a bomb ripped through a packed train during the morning rush hour.

Reuters

Equipment Comes In

March 29: Emergency workers and firefighters carry equipment in Moscow on their way to a subway system laid waste by twin bombings Monday morning.

AP

Bodies Come Out

March 29: Victims emerge. Emergency workers carry out a body from the Park Kultury metro station in Moscow after a terrorist attack President Obama condemned as a "heinous" crime.

Reuters

Returning to the Trains

March 29: Mixed company: Police officers and a few stray commuters wait on the nearly empty platforms of the Park Kultury subway station. Normally jam-packed during rush hour, it was a quiet shell Monday afternoon in the hours following a deadly terrorist attack that took dozens of lives.

AP

In the Tunnel

March 29: With more than a bit of nerves, people ride the escalators at Park Kultury metro station in Moscow just hours after a deadly blast tore through a crowded train at the subway stop, one of two to rock the city Monday morning.

Reuters

Medvedev Speaks

March 29: Russian President Dmitry Medvedev speaks following a double bombing on Moscow's subway system, declaring that Russia would act "without compromise" to root out terrorists.

Reuters

Moscow Subway Bombings

Two female homicide bombers blew themselves up on Moscow's subway system as it was jam-packed with rush-hour passengers Monday, killing at least 38 people and wounding over 100.