Europe

French candidates boost security ahead of tense vote

  • FILE - In this Feb.5, 2017 file photo, French far-right leader presidential candidate Marine Le Pen acknowledges applause in Lyon, central France. Do voters judge a book by its cover? France's presidential candidates certainly think they do, and more than ever are trying to get their political message across through their wardrobes, from centrist Emmanuel Macron's regular-guy suits to far right leader Marine Le Pen's masculine dark wardrobe and hard-left Jean-Luc Melenchon's communist-inspired jackets. (AP Photo/Michel Euler, File)

    FILE - In this Feb.5, 2017 file photo, French far-right leader presidential candidate Marine Le Pen acknowledges applause in Lyon, central France. Do voters judge a book by its cover? France's presidential candidates certainly think they do, and more than ever are trying to get their political message across through their wardrobes, from centrist Emmanuel Macron's regular-guy suits to far right leader Marine Le Pen's masculine dark wardrobe and hard-left Jean-Luc Melenchon's communist-inspired jackets. (AP Photo/Michel Euler, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • French presidential election candidate for the En Marche ! movement Emmanuel Macron reacts during his visit at the KRYS group's headquarters in Bazainville, near Paris Tuesday April 18, 2017. The two-round presidential election is set for April 23 and May 7. (Thomas Samson/ pool photo via AP)

    French presidential election candidate for the En Marche ! movement Emmanuel Macron reacts during his visit at the KRYS group's headquarters in Bazainville, near Paris Tuesday April 18, 2017. The two-round presidential election is set for April 23 and May 7. (Thomas Samson/ pool photo via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • Francois Fillon, right, former French Prime Minister, member of the Republicans political party and 2017 French presidential election candidate of the French centre-right, is greeted by supporters as he arrives to attend a campaign rally in Lille, France, Tuesday, April 18, 2017. (Christian Hartmann/Pool photo via AP)

    Francois Fillon, right, former French Prime Minister, member of the Republicans political party and 2017 French presidential election candidate of the French centre-right, is greeted by supporters as he arrives to attend a campaign rally in Lille, France, Tuesday, April 18, 2017. (Christian Hartmann/Pool photo via AP)  (The Associated Press)

French far-right presidential candidate Marine Le Pen says all the presidential contenders — and all French people — are potential attack targets.

The candidates for France's first-round presidential election Sunday have increased security in recent days. Authorities announced Tuesday that they had arrested two Islamic radicals suspected of plotting a possible attack around the vote.

While prosecutors haven't identified the potential targets, Le Pen said on BFM television that "we are all targets. All the French."

Le Pen also defended her decision to force national French news network TF1 to take down the European flag during an interview Tuesday night. She said Wednesday that "I am a candidate in the election for the French republic" and said Europe is acting like France's "enemy."