Europe

The Latest: Family honors American killed in London attack

  • Family members of U.S. tourist Kurt Cochran, who was killed in Wednesday's London attack, and his wife Melissa, who was injured, attend a press conference at New Scotland Yard, the headquarters of London's Metropolitan Police force, in London, Monday, March 27, 2017. British police say that two people remain in custody following last week's attack in London as messaging services face criticism for encrypted networks that allow attackers to communicate in secret.(AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

    Family members of U.S. tourist Kurt Cochran, who was killed in Wednesday's London attack, and his wife Melissa, who was injured, attend a press conference at New Scotland Yard, the headquarters of London's Metropolitan Police force, in London, Monday, March 27, 2017. British police say that two people remain in custody following last week's attack in London as messaging services face criticism for encrypted networks that allow attackers to communicate in secret.(AP Photo/Matt Dunham)  (The Associated Press)

  • People view floral tributes to victims of Wednesday's attack outside the Houses of Parliament in London, Friday, March 24, 2017. On Thursday authorities identified a 52-year-old Briton as the man who mowed down pedestrians and stabbed a policeman to death outside Parliament in London, saying he had a long criminal record and once was investigated for extremism — but was not currently on a terrorism watch list. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)

    People view floral tributes to victims of Wednesday's attack outside the Houses of Parliament in London, Friday, March 24, 2017. On Thursday authorities identified a 52-year-old Briton as the man who mowed down pedestrians and stabbed a policeman to death outside Parliament in London, saying he had a long criminal record and once was investigated for extremism — but was not currently on a terrorism watch list. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)  (The Associated Press)

  • PC recruits observe a minute's silence at their passing out parade at Peel House, in Colindale,  England, Friday, March 24, 2017, with the Police Colours' Flag lowered and a Union flag flown at half mast following the death of policeman Keith Palmer during an attack in Westminster.  In a briefing outside Scotland Yard, London's top counterterror officer, Mark Rowley, said two more "significant" arrests had been made, bringing to nine the number of people in custody over Wednesday's attack. (Nick Ansell/PA  via AP)

    PC recruits observe a minute's silence at their passing out parade at Peel House, in Colindale, England, Friday, March 24, 2017, with the Police Colours' Flag lowered and a Union flag flown at half mast following the death of policeman Keith Palmer during an attack in Westminster. In a briefing outside Scotland Yard, London's top counterterror officer, Mark Rowley, said two more "significant" arrests had been made, bringing to nine the number of people in custody over Wednesday's attack. (Nick Ansell/PA via AP)  (The Associated Press)

The Latest on London attack investigation (all times local):

12:25 p.m.

The family of an American man killed last week in the London attack has offered tribute to his generosity and say they are grateful for the help and support so many have shown during a horrible time.

Kurt W. Cochran from Utah was on the last day of a European trip celebrating his 25th wedding anniversary when he was killed on Westminster Bridge. They were visiting her parents, who are serving as Mormon missionaries in London.

Family spokesman Clint Payne told reporters Tuesday that Cochran's wife, Melissa, is steadily improving.

Payne says the most difficult aspect of the experience has been that "Kurt is no longer with us, and we miss him terribly."

Payne says that Cochran "left a legacy of generosity and service that continues to inspire us."

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8:55 a.m.

British police say that two people remain in custody following last week's attack in London as messaging services face criticism for encrypted networks that allow attackers to communicate in secret.

Attacker Khalid Masood is believed to have used the messaging service WhatsApp before running down pedestrians on Westminster Bridge and storming a gate outside Parliament armed with two knives. Four died in the rampage, including a police officer.

Encryption makes it more difficult to know whether Masood was acting with an accomplice. Britain's Home Secretary Amber Rudd wants technology companies to do more to make it possible for security services to have access to such messages.

Police say that a 30-year-old man arrested in Birmingham on Sunday and a 58-year-old man arrested shortly after the attack remain in police custody.

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8 a.m.

The European Union's presidency says people's privacy must be protected following British calls for police access to encrypted messages in case of attacks.

Maltese Interior Minister Carmelo Abela said Monday "there is a fine line here. We need to of course protect the privacy of the people but we also have to protect the security of the people."

British Home Secretary Amber Rudd said Sunday that "we need to make sure that organizations like WhatsApp — and there are plenty of others like that — don't provide a secret place for terrorists to communicate with each other."

London attacker Khalid Masood sent a WhatsApp message that can't be accessed because it was encrypted.

Abela said that EU states and internet providers should continue talks to establish the right security-privacy balance.