Asia

Philippine VP blasts Duterte's drug crackdown, cites abuses

FILE - In this Dec. 5, 2016 file photo, Philippine Vice President Leni Robredo answers questions from the media during a news conference following her resignation from her cabinet post under President Rodrigo Duterte in suburban Quezon city, south of Manila, Philippines. The Philippine vice president has raised alarms over the president's bloody crackdown against illegal drugs, which she says can't be solved "with bullets alone," and she also asked Filipinos to "defy brazen incursions on their rights."  The comments are one of Robredo's sharpest critiques so far of President Rodrigo Duterte's campaign and are likely to antagonize him because they are intended for an international forum of human rights advocates, whom he has often lambasted.  (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez, File)

FILE - In this Dec. 5, 2016 file photo, Philippine Vice President Leni Robredo answers questions from the media during a news conference following her resignation from her cabinet post under President Rodrigo Duterte in suburban Quezon city, south of Manila, Philippines. The Philippine vice president has raised alarms over the president's bloody crackdown against illegal drugs, which she says can't be solved "with bullets alone," and she also asked Filipinos to "defy brazen incursions on their rights." The comments are one of Robredo's sharpest critiques so far of President Rodrigo Duterte's campaign and are likely to antagonize him because they are intended for an international forum of human rights advocates, whom he has often lambasted. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez, File)  (The Associated Press)

The Philippine vice president has raised alarms over the president's bloody crackdown against illegal drugs, which she says can't be solved "with bullets alone," and she also asked Filipinos to "defy brazen incursions on their rights."

The comments are one of Vice President Leni Robredo's sharpest critiques so far of President Rodrigo Duterte's campaign and are likely to antagonize him because they are intended for an international forum of human rights advocates, whom he has often lambasted.

Robredo's office issued a videotape of her comments to media Wednesday. In her speech to be shown Thursday in a U.N.-linked forum on extrajudicial killings in Vienna, Austria, she cited specific complaints of abuses, including how close relatives of drug suspects have been threatened if the real targets were not found by enforcers.