Asia

Philippines, communist rebels agree to resume talks, truce

FILE - In this Wednesday, March 8, 2017, file photo, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte gestures as he addresses thousands of the country's municipal councilors during its 10th National Congress in suburban Pasay city, south of Manila, Philippines. The Philippine government and communist rebels say they have agreed to resume peace talks and restore separate cease-fires after an escalation of deadly clashes. Presidential adviser Jesus Dureza said Sunday, March 12, that government and rebel negotiators would resume talks early next month and discuss the terms of a broader cease-fire. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez, File)

FILE - In this Wednesday, March 8, 2017, file photo, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte gestures as he addresses thousands of the country's municipal councilors during its 10th National Congress in suburban Pasay city, south of Manila, Philippines. The Philippine government and communist rebels say they have agreed to resume peace talks and restore separate cease-fires after an escalation of deadly clashes. Presidential adviser Jesus Dureza said Sunday, March 12, that government and rebel negotiators would resume talks early next month and discuss the terms of a broader cease-fire. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez, File)  (The Associated Press)

The Philippine government and communist rebels say they have agreed to resume peace talks and restore separate cease-fires after an escalation of deadly clashes.

Presidential adviser Jesus Dureza said Sunday that government and rebel negotiators would resume talks early next month and discuss the terms of a broader cease-fire.

Norway, which has been brokering the negotiations, hosted two days of informal talks in the Netherlands that led to a decision to resume the talks.

The Philippines also has agreed to release a rebel consultant to the talks and reinstate immunities from arrest for other New People's Army guerrilla consultants.

The 48-year communist rebellion, one of Asia's longest, has left about 40,000 combatants and civilians dead and stunted economic development.