The Americas

Schools reopen in Brazil state paralyzed by police protest

  • Brazil's President Michel Temer speaks during a press conference at the Planalto Presidential Palace, in Brasilia, Brazil, Monday, Feb. 13, 2017, where he spoke on the security vacuum created by a "police halt" in the Brazilian state Espirito Santo. Temer called the police halt “an insurgency against the Constitution.” Authorities have threatened to prosecute officers who do not respond to the calls to return to duty. The Brazilian Constitution prohibits police from going on strike. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

    Brazil's President Michel Temer speaks during a press conference at the Planalto Presidential Palace, in Brasilia, Brazil, Monday, Feb. 13, 2017, where he spoke on the security vacuum created by a "police halt" in the Brazilian state Espirito Santo. Temer called the police halt “an insurgency against the Constitution.” Authorities have threatened to prosecute officers who do not respond to the calls to return to duty. The Brazilian Constitution prohibits police from going on strike. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)  (The Associated Press)

  • Brazil's President Michel Temer adjusts his microphones during a press conference at the Planalto Presidential Palace, in Brasilia, Brazil, Monday, Feb. 13, 2017, where he spoke on the security vacuum created by a "police halt" in the Brazilian state Espirito Santo. Temer called the police halt “an insurgency against the Constitution.” Authorities have threatened to prosecute officers who do not respond to the calls to return to duty. The Brazilian Constitution prohibits police from going on strike. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

    Brazil's President Michel Temer adjusts his microphones during a press conference at the Planalto Presidential Palace, in Brasilia, Brazil, Monday, Feb. 13, 2017, where he spoke on the security vacuum created by a "police halt" in the Brazilian state Espirito Santo. Temer called the police halt “an insurgency against the Constitution.” Authorities have threatened to prosecute officers who do not respond to the calls to return to duty. The Brazilian Constitution prohibits police from going on strike. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)  (The Associated Press)

  • Brazil's President Michel Temer reacts during a press conference at the Planalto Presidential Palace, in Brasilia, Brazil, Monday, Feb. 13, 2017, where he spoke on the security vacuum created by a "police halt" in the Brazilian state Espirito Santo. Temer called the police halt “an insurgency against the Constitution.” Authorities have threatened to prosecute officers who do not respond to the calls to return to duty.
The Brazilian Constitution prohibits police from going on strike. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

    Brazil's President Michel Temer reacts during a press conference at the Planalto Presidential Palace, in Brasilia, Brazil, Monday, Feb. 13, 2017, where he spoke on the security vacuum created by a "police halt" in the Brazilian state Espirito Santo. Temer called the police halt “an insurgency against the Constitution.” Authorities have threatened to prosecute officers who do not respond to the calls to return to duty. The Brazilian Constitution prohibits police from going on strike. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)  (The Associated Press)

Children are returning to school and most public transport is operating again in a Brazilian state that was paralyzed by a protest that prevented military police from patrolling.

The Espirito Santo state government said in a statement that public schools that closed last week reopened Monday. Public transport in the capital, Vitoria, was operating nearly a full schedule, and health centers are reopening.

Relatives and friends of military police have protested outside barracks for 10 days, preventing vehicles and often officers themselves from leaving. That security vacuum led to a crime wave and forced the state to call in federal troops. Over the weekend, military police also began returning to work.