Europe

Poland's media meet unexpected limitations in parliament

  • A parliamentary guard walks along a corridor that previously has been freely accessible, in the parliament building, in Warsaw, Poland, Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017. Reporters have met some unexpected restrictions in Poland's parliament, against earlier assurances that controversial plans to curb their movement have been waved. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)

    A parliamentary guard walks along a corridor that previously has been freely accessible, in the parliament building, in Warsaw, Poland, Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017. Reporters have met some unexpected restrictions in Poland's parliament, against earlier assurances that controversial plans to curb their movement have been waved. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)  (The Associated Press)

  • A parliamentary guard stands at the entrance to a corridor that previously has been freely accessible, in the parliament building, in Warsaw, Poland, Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017. Reporters have met some unexpected restrictions in Poland's parliament, against earlier assurances that controversial plans to curb their movement have been waved. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)

    A parliamentary guard stands at the entrance to a corridor that previously has been freely accessible, in the parliament building, in Warsaw, Poland, Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017. Reporters have met some unexpected restrictions in Poland's parliament, against earlier assurances that controversial plans to curb their movement have been waved. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)  (The Associated Press)

Poland's parliament has imposed unexpected restrictions on reporters, against earlier assurances that controversial plans to curb their movement have been waived.

Plans last month by the ruling conservative party to restrict media movement and journalists' access to lawmakers in parliament led to a political crisis and opposition sit-in in parliament. The ruling party then declared that the restrictions were abandoned.

But arriving for a session on Wednesday, reporters met parliament guards checking accreditations at an entrance to one of the corridors that has been freely accessible. Now, reporters can only conduct interviews there on lawmaker' consent.

Opposition lawmakers said it was a wrong move, apparently meant to shun the media.

The usual space for work and briefings and the main corridors remain unrestricted.