Europe

Priest who listens to mass murderer Breivik testifies

  • Anders Behring Breivik, left, talks with his lawyer Oystein Storrvik in a courtroom on the fourth day of the appeal case in Borgarting Court of Appeal at Telemark prison in Skien, Norway, Friday, Jan. 13, 2017. Norwegian mass murderer Breivik told a panel of judges Thursday that his solitary confinement in prison had deeply damaged him and made him even more radical in his neo-Nazi beliefs. (Lise Aaserud/NTB scanpix via AP)

    Anders Behring Breivik, left, talks with his lawyer Oystein Storrvik in a courtroom on the fourth day of the appeal case in Borgarting Court of Appeal at Telemark prison in Skien, Norway, Friday, Jan. 13, 2017. Norwegian mass murderer Breivik told a panel of judges Thursday that his solitary confinement in prison had deeply damaged him and made him even more radical in his neo-Nazi beliefs. (Lise Aaserud/NTB scanpix via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • Anders Behring Breivik, right, escorted by police officers, enters a courtroom on the fourth day of the appeal case in Borgarting Court of Appeal at Telemark prison in Skien, Norway, Friday, Jan. 13, 2017. Norwegian mass murderer Breivik told a panel of judges Thursday that his solitary confinement in prison had deeply damaged him and made him even more radical in his neo-Nazi beliefs. (Lise Aaserud/NTB scanpix via AP)

    Anders Behring Breivik, right, escorted by police officers, enters a courtroom on the fourth day of the appeal case in Borgarting Court of Appeal at Telemark prison in Skien, Norway, Friday, Jan. 13, 2017. Norwegian mass murderer Breivik told a panel of judges Thursday that his solitary confinement in prison had deeply damaged him and made him even more radical in his neo-Nazi beliefs. (Lise Aaserud/NTB scanpix via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • Anders Behring Breivik, right, escorted by police officers, enters a courtroom on the fourth day of the appeal case in Borgarting Court of Appeal at Telemark prison in Skien, Norway, Friday, Jan. 13, 2017. Norwegian mass murderer Breivik told a panel of judges Thursday that his solitary confinement in prison had deeply damaged him and made him even more radical in his neo-Nazi beliefs. (Lise Aaserud/NTB scanpix via AP)

    Anders Behring Breivik, right, escorted by police officers, enters a courtroom on the fourth day of the appeal case in Borgarting Court of Appeal at Telemark prison in Skien, Norway, Friday, Jan. 13, 2017. Norwegian mass murderer Breivik told a panel of judges Thursday that his solitary confinement in prison had deeply damaged him and made him even more radical in his neo-Nazi beliefs. (Lise Aaserud/NTB scanpix via AP)  (The Associated Press)

The priest who acts as a prison confidante to Norwegian mass murderer Anders Behring Breivik says his role is to make "things a little bit better for the most despised person" in Norway.

Tormod Klovning told a court Friday that he speaks to Breivik through a glass wall that makes him feel safe.

Klovning is the only person from outside the prison system to meet regularly with Breivik. He is not obliged to report on the content of their discussions.

The right-wing extremist who killed 77 people in a 2011 bomb-and-shooting rampage is attending a hearing at the high-security prison in southern Norway where he is serving a 21-year sentence. The Norwegian government has appealed a lower court ruling that Breivik's isolation in prison violates his human rights.