The Americas

US Senate 'torture' report sought in 9/11 case at Guantanamo

FILE - In this June 6, 2008 file photo reviewed by the U.S. military, the sun rises over Camp Delta detention compound which has housed foreign prisoners since 2002, at Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base, in Cuba. Defense lawyers in the Sept. 11 war crimes case at Guantanamo Bay asked a judge Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2016 to secure a copy of a U.S. Senate report on the CIA's harsh interrogation tactics before President-elect Donald Trump takes office, at which point they fear it might be too late. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, Pool, File)

FILE - In this June 6, 2008 file photo reviewed by the U.S. military, the sun rises over Camp Delta detention compound which has housed foreign prisoners since 2002, at Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base, in Cuba. Defense lawyers in the Sept. 11 war crimes case at Guantanamo Bay asked a judge Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2016 to secure a copy of a U.S. Senate report on the CIA's harsh interrogation tactics before President-elect Donald Trump takes office, at which point they fear it might be too late. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, Pool, File)  (The Associated Press)

Defense lawyers in the Sept. 11 war crimes case at Guantanamo Bay say they may be running out of time to get access to a U.S. Senate report on the CIA's harsh interrogation tactics.

Lawyers for men accused in the attack have asked a judge to get a copy of the report from the Defense Department before President-elect Donald Trump takes office next month. Attorney James Connell told the judge at a hearing Tuesday at the U.S. base in Cuba that the incoming administration may be less inclined to provide the report or may even destroy it. A summary was released in 2014.

Prosecutors oppose the request. They argue the defense does not need the so-called "torture report" and the judge may not have authority to order it turned over.