The Americas

Circular temple to god of wind uncovered in Mexico City

  • A temple dedicated to the god of wind Ehecatl-Quetzalcoatl lays unearthed at the construction site of a shopping center in Mexico City, Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016. Archeologists from Mexico’s National Anthropology and History Institute say this structure where eight sets of human remains were found is worth preserving and will eventually be made accessible to the public. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

    A temple dedicated to the god of wind Ehecatl-Quetzalcoatl lays unearthed at the construction site of a shopping center in Mexico City, Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016. Archeologists from Mexico’s National Anthropology and History Institute say this structure where eight sets of human remains were found is worth preserving and will eventually be made accessible to the public. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)  (The Associated Press)

  • A construction worker labors near a temple dedicated to the god of wind Ehecatl-Quetzalcoatl, unearthed at the site of a shopping center being built in Mexico City, Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016. Archeologists from Mexico’s National Anthropology and History Institute say this structure where eight sets of human remains were found is worth preserving and will eventually be made accessible to the public. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

    A construction worker labors near a temple dedicated to the god of wind Ehecatl-Quetzalcoatl, unearthed at the site of a shopping center being built in Mexico City, Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016. Archeologists from Mexico’s National Anthropology and History Institute say this structure where eight sets of human remains were found is worth preserving and will eventually be made accessible to the public. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)  (The Associated Press)

Archeologists working in Mexico City have uncovered a circular temple built more than 650 years ago to worship a god of wind.

It was excavated at a site discovered two years ago when a mid-20th century supermarket was demolished. The circular platform dedicated to Ehecatl-Quetzalcoatl now sits in the shadow of a new shopping center under construction.

The temple, 36 feet across, falls within what is believed to be the perimeter of a large ceremonial site in the Tlatelolco neighborhood. Much of that perimeter is invisible, covered by an urban landscape.

But archeologists from Mexico's National Anthropology and History Institute say this structure where eight sets of human remains were found is worth preserving and will eventually be made accessible to the public. Similar round temples have been discovered elsewhere.