Europe

Communist rebels see Philippine-US ties troubling peace deal

  • In this photo taken Nov. 23, 2016, a member of the New People's Army communist rebels with face painted to conceal his identity, stands in formation during ceremonies held at their guerrilla encampment tucked in the harsh wilderness of the Sierra Madre mountains southeast of Manila, Philippines. Communist guerrillas warn that a peace deal with President Rodrigo Duterte's government is unlikely if he won't end the Philippines' treaty alliance with the United States and resist control by other countries. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

    In this photo taken Nov. 23, 2016, a member of the New People's Army communist rebels with face painted to conceal his identity, stands in formation during ceremonies held at their guerrilla encampment tucked in the harsh wilderness of the Sierra Madre mountains southeast of Manila, Philippines. Communist guerrillas warn that a peace deal with President Rodrigo Duterte's government is unlikely if he won't end the Philippines' treaty alliance with the United States and resist control by other countries. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this photo taken Nov. 23, 2016, New People's Army new regional rebel commander and spokesman Jaime Padilla, who uses the nom de guerre Comrade Diego, raises his clenched fists after a clandestine news conference in a encampment tucked in the harsh wilderness of the Sierra Madre mountains southeast of Manila, Philippines. Communist guerrillas warn that a peace deal with President Rodrigo Duterte's government is unlikely if he won't end the Philippines' treaty alliance with the United States and resist control by other countries. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

    In this photo taken Nov. 23, 2016, New People's Army new regional rebel commander and spokesman Jaime Padilla, who uses the nom de guerre Comrade Diego, raises his clenched fists after a clandestine news conference in a encampment tucked in the harsh wilderness of the Sierra Madre mountains southeast of Manila, Philippines. Communist guerrillas warn that a peace deal with President Rodrigo Duterte's government is unlikely if he won't end the Philippines' treaty alliance with the United States and resist control by other countries. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this photo taken Nov. 23, 2016, members of the New People's Army communist rebels march during the entry of colors as part of ceremonies before a clandestine news conference held at their guerrilla encampment tucked in the harsh wilderness of the Sierra Madre mountains southeast of Manila, Philippines. Communist guerrillas warn that a peace deal with President Rodrigo Duterte's government is unlikely if he won't end the Philippines' treaty alliance with the United States and resist control by other countries. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

    In this photo taken Nov. 23, 2016, members of the New People's Army communist rebels march during the entry of colors as part of ceremonies before a clandestine news conference held at their guerrilla encampment tucked in the harsh wilderness of the Sierra Madre mountains southeast of Manila, Philippines. Communist guerrillas warn that a peace deal with President Rodrigo Duterte's government is unlikely if he won't end the Philippines' treaty alliance with the United States and resist control by other countries. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)  (The Associated Press)

Communist guerrillas warn that a peace deal with President Rodrigo Duterte's government is unlikely if he won't end the Philippines' treaty alliance with the United States and resist control by other countries.

Regional New People's Army rebel commander and spokesman Jaime Padilla said at a news conference in a mountain encampment Wednesday that insurgents have documented more than 100 military violations of the cease-fire Duterte declared in August. The alleged violations include combat operations and surveillance that may re-ignite fighting.

Padilla said Maoist guerrillas remain committed to pursuing talks with Duterte, however, while criticizing his allowing dictator Ferdinand Marcos's burial in a heroes' cemetery and the killings of poor drug addicts.

Duterte says he wants Philippine foreign policy less oriented toward Washington and has tried to befriend China and Russia.