Europe

Top EU lawmaker intervenes to try to save Canada trade pact

  • President of the European Parliament Martin Schulz arrives for the EU summit in Brussels, Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016. British Prime Minister Theresa May will hold her first talks with European Union leaders and tell them that the U.K.’s decision to leave the bloc is irreversible. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

    President of the European Parliament Martin Schulz arrives for the EU summit in Brussels, Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016. British Prime Minister Theresa May will hold her first talks with European Union leaders and tell them that the U.K.’s decision to leave the bloc is irreversible. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)  (The Associated Press)

  • A workman dismantles the setting where German Chancellor Angela Merkel gave her the final press briefing at the EU Summit in Brussels, Friday, Oct. 21, 2016. The European Union's attempt to finalize a massive free trade deal with Canada remained in limbo Friday, with the tiny Belgian region that's holding up the pact saying its objections had not yet been sufficiently addressed. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

    A workman dismantles the setting where German Chancellor Angela Merkel gave her the final press briefing at the EU Summit in Brussels, Friday, Oct. 21, 2016. The European Union's attempt to finalize a massive free trade deal with Canada remained in limbo Friday, with the tiny Belgian region that's holding up the pact saying its objections had not yet been sufficiently addressed. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)  (The Associated Press)

The president of the European Parliament, Martin Schulz, is trying to salvage an EU trade deal with Canada in a personal intervention following the breakdown of talks.

Schulz planned Saturday to meet Chrystia Freeland a day after Canada's international trade minister said she was going home as the EU appeared incapable of reaching unanimous agreement. Schulz also planned to meet the Belgian regional leader at the heart of the standoff.

Politicians in the Belgian region of Wallonia argue that the proposed deal would undermine labor, environment and consumer standards and allow multinationals to crush local companies. They vow to block a pact that the rest of the 28-nation EU and Canada are ready to sign.

"We can't stop at the last mile," Schulz said in a tweet.