Asia

Appeal of women's soccer growing, FIFA chief says in Jordan

  • North Korea players celebrate after they won the final game of the FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup against Japan, at Amman International Stadium in Amman, Jordan, Friday, Oct. 21, 2016. The North Korean beat Japan in penalty kicks to win the 2016 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup. North Korea defeated Japan 5:4 in a penalty shootout.(AP Photo/Raad Adayleh)

    North Korea players celebrate after they won the final game of the FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup against Japan, at Amman International Stadium in Amman, Jordan, Friday, Oct. 21, 2016. The North Korean beat Japan in penalty kicks to win the 2016 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup. North Korea defeated Japan 5:4 in a penalty shootout.(AP Photo/Raad Adayleh)  (The Associated Press)

  • North Korea's Jon Yon Sim, right, fights for the ball against Japan's Riko Ueki during the FIFA U-17 women's World Cup final match in Amman Friday, Oct. 21, 2016. North Korea defeated Japan 5:4 in a penalty shootout and became champion. (AP Photo/Raad Adayleh)

    North Korea's Jon Yon Sim, right, fights for the ball against Japan's Riko Ueki during the FIFA U-17 women's World Cup final match in Amman Friday, Oct. 21, 2016. North Korea defeated Japan 5:4 in a penalty shootout and became champion. (AP Photo/Raad Adayleh)  (The Associated Press)

  • North Korea players celebrate after they won at final game of the FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup against Japan, at Amman International Stadium in Amman, Jordan, Friday, Oct. 21, 2016. The North Korean beat Japan in penalty kicks to win the 2016 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup. North Korea defeated Japan 5:4 in a penalty shootout. (AP Photo/Raad Adayleh)

    North Korea players celebrate after they won at final game of the FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup against Japan, at Amman International Stadium in Amman, Jordan, Friday, Oct. 21, 2016. The North Korean beat Japan in penalty kicks to win the 2016 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup. North Korea defeated Japan 5:4 in a penalty shootout. (AP Photo/Raad Adayleh)  (The Associated Press)

FIFA's president says the U-17 Women's World Cup hosted by Jordan shows that "women's football is not only confined to some parts of the world."

Gianni Infantino spoke late Friday, after attending the final match in which North Korea defeated Japan 5:4 in a penalty shootout.

The competition was the first international women's soccer tournament to be held in the Middle East.

Infantino said more needs to be done to grow women's soccer in the region and that "the future will show we were right in coming here." He says women's youth soccer has developed, and that "now the girls are really athletes with top skills."

The youth tournament was first held in 2008 and takes place every other year.

North Korea became champion for the second time Friday.