Pacific

Ancient bird from dinosaur area probably sounded like duck

  • A recently discovered 70 million year old fossil of the “Vegavis Iaai” bird that lived in Antarctica’s Vega Island more than 70 million years ago is placed on silhouette and a model of the bird, on a desk before a conference in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016. Scientists say that the bird probably sounded like a modern-day duck. They based their findings on the unearthed fossils of the bird’s sound-producing vocal organ known as the syrinx. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

    A recently discovered 70 million year old fossil of the “Vegavis Iaai” bird that lived in Antarctica’s Vega Island more than 70 million years ago is placed on silhouette and a model of the bird, on a desk before a conference in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016. Scientists say that the bird probably sounded like a modern-day duck. They based their findings on the unearthed fossils of the bird’s sound-producing vocal organ known as the syrinx. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)  (The Associated Press)

  • A recently discovered 70 million year old fossil of the “Vegavis Iaai” bird that lived in Antarctica’s Vega Island more than 70 million years ago is placed on silhouette of the bird, on a desk before a conference in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016. Scientists say that the bird probably sounded like a modern-day duck. They based their findings on the unearthed fossils of the bird’s sound-producing vocal organ known as the syrinx. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

    A recently discovered 70 million year old fossil of the “Vegavis Iaai” bird that lived in Antarctica’s Vega Island more than 70 million years ago is placed on silhouette of the bird, on a desk before a conference in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016. Scientists say that the bird probably sounded like a modern-day duck. They based their findings on the unearthed fossils of the bird’s sound-producing vocal organ known as the syrinx. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)  (The Associated Press)

Scientists for years have known what birds living at the end of the age of dinosaurs looked like. Now, they say they might know what one sounded like: quack!

The team of scientists says the "Vegavis Iaai" bird that lived in Antarctica's Vega Island more than 70 million years ago probably sounded like a modern-day duck. They based their findings on unearthed fossils of the bird's sound-producing vocal organ known as the syrinx.

The team held a news conference in Buenos Aires on Wednesday after their conclusions were presented in the Nature journal.