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The Latest: French officials 'honored' by chemistry Nobel

  • The Royal Academy of Sciences members, from left to right, Professor Sara Snogerup Linse, Professor Goran K Hansson and Professor Olof Ramstrom present the 2016 Nobel Chemistry Prize at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016. Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Fraser Stoddart and Bernard Feringa have been awarded the Nobel chemistry prize. (Henrik Montgomery /TT via AP)

    The Royal Academy of Sciences members, from left to right, Professor Sara Snogerup Linse, Professor Goran K Hansson and Professor Olof Ramstrom present the 2016 Nobel Chemistry Prize at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016. Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Fraser Stoddart and Bernard Feringa have been awarded the Nobel chemistry prize. (Henrik Montgomery /TT via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • This is a image taken on Nov. 28, 2013 made available by the University of Groningen on Wednesday Oct. 5, 2016 of Dutch scientist Bernard "Ben" Feringa.  Feringa was one of  the three scientists who won the Nobel Prize in chemistry on Wednesday for developing the world's smallest machines, work that could revolutionize computer technology and lead to a new type of battery. (Jeroen Van Kooten/University of Groningen via AP)

    This is a image taken on Nov. 28, 2013 made available by the University of Groningen on Wednesday Oct. 5, 2016 of Dutch scientist Bernard "Ben" Feringa. Feringa was one of the three scientists who won the Nobel Prize in chemistry on Wednesday for developing the world's smallest machines, work that could revolutionize computer technology and lead to a new type of battery. (Jeroen Van Kooten/University of Groningen via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this Oct. 2014 photo,  provided by the University of Strasbourg (Unistra)  Nobel laureate Jean-Pierre Sauvage speaks during an interview in Strasbourg, eastern France. Frenchman Jean-Pierre Sauvage, British-born Fraser Stoddart and Dutch scientist Bernard "Ben" Feringa share the 8 million kronor ($930,000) prize for the "design and synthesis of molecular machines," the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said. Three scientists won the Nobel Prize in chemistry on Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016 for developing the world's smallest machines, work that could revolutionize computer technology and lead to a new type of battery. (Catherine Schroder/Unistra via AP)

    In this Oct. 2014 photo, provided by the University of Strasbourg (Unistra) Nobel laureate Jean-Pierre Sauvage speaks during an interview in Strasbourg, eastern France. Frenchman Jean-Pierre Sauvage, British-born Fraser Stoddart and Dutch scientist Bernard "Ben" Feringa share the 8 million kronor ($930,000) prize for the "design and synthesis of molecular machines," the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said. Three scientists won the Nobel Prize in chemistry on Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016 for developing the world's smallest machines, work that could revolutionize computer technology and lead to a new type of battery. (Catherine Schroder/Unistra via AP)  (The Associated Press)

The Latest on the Nobel prize in chemistry (all times local):

12:20 p.m.

Officials at the University of Strasbourg, where Sauvage is a professor emeritus in the Institute of Science and Supramolecular Engineering, said they were overwhelmed and honored by the news. They said Sauvage plans to speak publicly in Strasbourg later Wednesday.

Sauvage's wife, contacted by telephone, was on the verge of tears as she told people that her husband had won the prize.

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11:55 a.m.

Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Fraser Stoddart and Bernard Feringa have won this year's Nobel Prize in chemistry for developing molecular machines.

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences says molecular machines "will most likely be used in the development of things such as new materials, sensors and energy storage systems."