Europe

French president vows to shut down unacceptable Calais camp

  • A migrant family beg for money at the Concorde bridge next to the French parliament, background, in Paris, Wednesday, Sept.21, 2016. The migrant crisis turns out to be a major battlefield for presidential candidates who are seizing on fears of immigration in campaigning for spring elections. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)

    A migrant family beg for money at the Concorde bridge next to the French parliament, background, in Paris, Wednesday, Sept.21, 2016. The migrant crisis turns out to be a major battlefield for presidential candidates who are seizing on fears of immigration in campaigning for spring elections. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE- In this Tuesday, August 23, 2016 file photo, migrants queue to receive their daily food distribution in a makeshift camp in Calais, northern France. French President Francois Hollande on Saturday Sept. 24, confirmed plans to close the squalid Calais migrant camp known as "the Jungle," saying he hopes authorities can relocate as many as 9,000 migrants to reception centers across France in the coming weeks. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler, File)

    FILE- In this Tuesday, August 23, 2016 file photo, migrants queue to receive their daily food distribution in a makeshift camp in Calais, northern France. French President Francois Hollande on Saturday Sept. 24, confirmed plans to close the squalid Calais migrant camp known as "the Jungle," saying he hopes authorities can relocate as many as 9,000 migrants to reception centers across France in the coming weeks. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler, File)  (The Associated Press)

President Francois Hollande says he hopes authorities can relocate as many as 9,000 migrants massed in a squalid camp in Calais to reception centers across France in the coming weeks.

Hollande, visiting one of France's 164 such reception centers in the city of Tours on Saturday, reiterated his pledge to shut the Calais camp, known as "the jungle."

He said conditions there are "not acceptable," especially for those fleeing war. The camp has become a symbol of his government's failure to tackle Europe's migrant crisis.

The reception centers will hold 40-50 people for up to four months, Hollande said, as their cases are examined. Migrants who don't seek asylum will be deported. Many local conservative politicians have resisted the centers.

Hollande is scheduled to visit Calais on Monday.