Middle East

South Sudan activists say intimidated for meeting diplomats

  • South Sudan's President Salva Kiir, left, takes members of the UN Security Council, including U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power, right, on a tour outside the presidential compound in the capital Juba, South Sudan, Sunday, Sept. 4, 2016. South Sudan has agreed to the deployment of a 4,000-strong regional protection force approved by the U.N. Security Council after first rejecting the peacekeepers as a violation of its sovereignty. (AP Photo/Justin Lynch)

    South Sudan's President Salva Kiir, left, takes members of the UN Security Council, including U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power, right, on a tour outside the presidential compound in the capital Juba, South Sudan, Sunday, Sept. 4, 2016. South Sudan has agreed to the deployment of a 4,000-strong regional protection force approved by the U.N. Security Council after first rejecting the peacekeepers as a violation of its sovereignty. (AP Photo/Justin Lynch)  (The Associated Press)

  • U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power, center, and other members of the United Nations Security Council speak to displaced people living in a church in Wau, in northwestern South Sudan, Sunday, Sept. 4, 2016. South Sudan has agreed to the deployment of a 4,000-strong regional protection force approved by the U.N. Security Council after first rejecting the peacekeepers as a violation of its sovereignty. (AP Photo/Justin Lynch)

    U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power, center, and other members of the United Nations Security Council speak to displaced people living in a church in Wau, in northwestern South Sudan, Sunday, Sept. 4, 2016. South Sudan has agreed to the deployment of a 4,000-strong regional protection force approved by the U.N. Security Council after first rejecting the peacekeepers as a violation of its sovereignty. (AP Photo/Justin Lynch)  (The Associated Press)

South Sudanese activists say they face government intimidation in retaliation for meeting with the visiting U.N. Security Council last weekend.

At least three local organizations have been told by South Sudan's government they cannot operate. On Wednesday, the U.S. envoy to South Sudan told Congress the number of blacklisted groups could be as high as 40.

One activist says the government harassment is in response to position papers that supported an arms embargo on South Sudan or a new regional protection force. The government dislikes both.

The head of one organization says he was prevented from attending the Security Council meeting.

Government officials were not immediately available for comment Thursday.

The United Nations says it is "deeply concerned."

South Sudan is struggling to recover from civil war.