Asia

Thailand's junta leader says elections in November 2017

  • Thailand's Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha arrives at the government house before a cabinet meeting in Bangkok, Thailand, Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2016. As he arrived, Prayuth explained that Sunday's referendum on the draft constitution, which won overwhelming approval, was part of the government's road map to political reforms and a bona fide democracy. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)

    Thailand's Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha arrives at the government house before a cabinet meeting in Bangkok, Thailand, Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2016. As he arrived, Prayuth explained that Sunday's referendum on the draft constitution, which won overwhelming approval, was part of the government's road map to political reforms and a bona fide democracy. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)  (The Associated Press)

  • Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha gestures as arrives at the government house before a cabinet meeting in Bangkok, Thailand, Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2016. As he arrived, Prayuth explained that Sunday's referendum on the draft constitution, which won overwhelming approval, was part of the government's road map to political reforms and a bona fide democracy. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)

    Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha gestures as arrives at the government house before a cabinet meeting in Bangkok, Thailand, Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2016. As he arrived, Prayuth explained that Sunday's referendum on the draft constitution, which won overwhelming approval, was part of the government's road map to political reforms and a bona fide democracy. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)  (The Associated Press)

  • Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha, center, arrives at the government house before a cabinet meeting in Bangkok, Thailand, Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2016. As he arrived, Prayuth explained that Sunday's referendum on the draft constitution, which won overwhelming approval, was part of the government's road map to political reforms and a bona fide democracy. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)

    Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha, center, arrives at the government house before a cabinet meeting in Bangkok, Thailand, Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2016. As he arrived, Prayuth explained that Sunday's referendum on the draft constitution, which won overwhelming approval, was part of the government's road map to political reforms and a bona fide democracy. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)  (The Associated Press)

Thailand's junta leader says he will hold elections in November 2017, under a newly approved constitution that will ensure the military's control over the next government.

Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha, the army chief who took power in a coup in 2014, has insisted before that he will hold elections in 2017 but until now had not given a specific month.

Speaking to reporters Tuesday, he dismissed a journalist's suggestion that the polls could be postponed to 2018.

Following the junta's so-called road map to democracy "would put us on November 2017 when the whole process would be complete. So why would the elections be held in 2018?" he said.