Europe

Turkish F-16s patrol skies days after failed coup

  • A protester salutes as he takes part in a rally in Taksim Square, Istanbul, Sunday, July 17, 2016. The Turkish government accelerated its crackdown on alleged plotters of the failed coup against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, with the justice minister saying Sunday that 6,000 people had been detained in the investigation, including three of the country's top generals and hundreds of soldiers. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

    A protester salutes as he takes part in a rally in Taksim Square, Istanbul, Sunday, July 17, 2016. The Turkish government accelerated its crackdown on alleged plotters of the failed coup against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, with the justice minister saying Sunday that 6,000 people had been detained in the investigation, including three of the country's top generals and hundreds of soldiers. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)  (The Associated Press)

  • Members of Turkey armed forces are escorted by police for their suspected involvement in Friday's attempted coup at the court house in Mugla, a Mediterrenean city of Turkey, Sunday, July 17, 2016. Following a failed coup against Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, his government moved swiftly to shore up his power and remove those perceived as an enemy, saying it has detained 6,000 people. (Tolga Adanali/Depo Photos via AP)

    Members of Turkey armed forces are escorted by police for their suspected involvement in Friday's attempted coup at the court house in Mugla, a Mediterrenean city of Turkey, Sunday, July 17, 2016. Following a failed coup against Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, his government moved swiftly to shore up his power and remove those perceived as an enemy, saying it has detained 6,000 people. (Tolga Adanali/Depo Photos via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • Islamic cleric Fethullah Gulen speaks to members of the media at his compound, Sunday, July 17, 2016, in Saylorsburg, Pa. Turkish officials have blamed a failed coup attempt on Gulen, who denies the accusation. (AP Photo/Chris Post)

    Islamic cleric Fethullah Gulen speaks to members of the media at his compound, Sunday, July 17, 2016, in Saylorsburg, Pa. Turkish officials have blamed a failed coup attempt on Gulen, who denies the accusation. (AP Photo/Chris Post)  (The Associated Press)

Warplanes have patrolled Turkey's skies following a failed coup, a sign that authorities fear the threat against the government is not yet over.

A senior official said Monday that F-16 jets guarded the Turkish airspace overnight, after a faction within the military launched an attempted coup late Friday against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. The official spoke on condition of anonymity in line with government rules.

The coup plotters sent warplanes firing on key government installations and tanks rolling into major cities, but the rebellion was quashed by loyal government forces and masses of civilians who took to the streets. At least 294 people were killed and more than 1,400 wounded.

The state-run news agency, Anadolu, said Erdogan ordered the overnight patrol by F-16s.