World

Mexico's Peña Nieto asks congress to rework anti-corruption law

Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto speaks during an event an agreement with the three major political parties was signed to create two new national television channels and form a powerful independent regulatory commission along the lines of the U.S. Federal Communications Commission, at the Technological Museum in Mexico City, Monday, March 11, 2013. Pena Nieto on Monday proposed a sweeping overhaul of the weak and chaotic regulations that have allowed the world's richest man and the largest Spanish-language media empire to exert near-total control of Mexico's lucrative telephone and television markets. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)

Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto speaks during an event an agreement with the three major political parties was signed to create two new national television channels and form a powerful independent regulatory commission along the lines of the U.S. Federal Communications Commission, at the Technological Museum in Mexico City, Monday, March 11, 2013. Pena Nieto on Monday proposed a sweeping overhaul of the weak and chaotic regulations that have allowed the world's richest man and the largest Spanish-language media empire to exert near-total control of Mexico's lucrative telephone and television markets. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)  (AP2013)

Mexico's president has asked congress to convene a special session to re-work an anti-corruption law and remove clauses widely viewed as a revenge move by politicians.

The Senate last week approved the final points of a law that would require politicians to publish their tax returns, holdings and potential conflicts of interest.

But in what was widely viewed as revenge, legislators voted to impose the same rules on anyone who receives government money. That would apparently apply to welfare recipients and government suppliers.

The president's legal adviser said Thursday that the clause would hurt private citizens' right to privacy. Humberto Castillejos said the law would be returned to the Senate for changes.

Mexican politicians including the president have been stung by scandals of corruption or apparent conflicts of interest.

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