An international human rights commission has criticized Poland's new law regulating police surveillance powers as leaving too much room for breaching the privacy of individuals.

The opinion issued Friday by the Venice Commission, a European body of constitutional law experts, was the second criticism it has issued concerning policies of Poland's conservative government that took power in November.

The commission said that safeguards included in the police law are insufficient to prevent "excessive use and unjustified interference with individual privacy."

It said wire-tapping and collecting of data related to the use of internet and mobile phones were areas where more oversight was needed.

Earlier this year the commission criticized Poland for effectively paralyzing the nation's Constitutional Tribunal.

The commission can recommend solutions but has no enforcement powers.