Europe

1st strikes, then floods, now trash: Paris in ordure fight

  • French railway workers and Labor unions members hold posters depicting the Euro 2016 trophy, during a demonstration against the French government and labor law reforms at Gare Du Nord Station in Paris France, Wednesday June 8, 2016. Workers of France's national rail service demonstrate as part of months of protests over changes to labor protections. Banners with the Cup read: "2016 strike: the cup is full" referring to a French expression meaning that someone is disgruntled. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

    French railway workers and Labor unions members hold posters depicting the Euro 2016 trophy, during a demonstration against the French government and labor law reforms at Gare Du Nord Station in Paris France, Wednesday June 8, 2016. Workers of France's national rail service demonstrate as part of months of protests over changes to labor protections. Banners with the Cup read: "2016 strike: the cup is full" referring to a French expression meaning that someone is disgruntled. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)  (The Associated Press)

  • French riot police officers secure the departure of commuters as railway workers and Labor unions members attend a demonstration against the French government and labor law reforms at Gare Du Nord Station in Paris France, Wednesday June 8, 2016. Workers of France's national rail service demonstrate as part of months of protests over changes to labor protections. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

    French riot police officers secure the departure of commuters as railway workers and Labor unions members attend a demonstration against the French government and labor law reforms at Gare Du Nord Station in Paris France, Wednesday June 8, 2016. Workers of France's national rail service demonstrate as part of months of protests over changes to labor protections. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)  (The Associated Press)

After a rough couple of months that have included protests, fuel shortages, rail strikes and once-in-a-generation floods, France's capital is facing a new challenge: Piles of uncollected ordure.

A new wave of strikes is disrupting trash collection in Paris with only two days to go until the European Championship soccer tournament, a sporting event predicted to draw 2.5 million spectators.

French media broadcast photographs of growing piles of garbage in the French capital Wednesday and trash bag barricades set up in front of waste facilities.

The mayor's office says garbage collection had been hindered for "several days."

French life has been disrupted for weeks by industrial action affecting trains and gas stations. A huge flood hit the capital last week, briefly shutting museums and drowning the Seine River's embankments.