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Breakaway Taliban faction expresses support for peace talks

  • In this picture take on Friday, May 27, 2016, members of a breakaway faction of the Taliban fighters guard during a patrol in Shindand district of Herat province, Afghanistan. Afghanistan's government has offered the new Taliban leader a choice: make peace or face the same fate as his predecessor, who was killed last week in a U.S. drone strike. (AP Photos/Allauddin Khan)

    In this picture take on Friday, May 27, 2016, members of a breakaway faction of the Taliban fighters guard during a patrol in Shindand district of Herat province, Afghanistan. Afghanistan's government has offered the new Taliban leader a choice: make peace or face the same fate as his predecessor, who was killed last week in a U.S. drone strike. (AP Photos/Allauddin Khan)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this Friday, May 27, 2016 photo, Senior leader of a breakaway faction of the Taliban Mullah Abdul Manan Niazi, center, delivers a speech to his fighters, in Shindand district of Herat province, Afghanistan. Niazi said Sunday, May 29, 2016 it was willing to hold peace talks with the Afghan government but would demand the imposition of Islamic law and the departure of all foreign forces. (AP Photos/Allauddin Khan)

    In this Friday, May 27, 2016 photo, Senior leader of a breakaway faction of the Taliban Mullah Abdul Manan Niazi, center, delivers a speech to his fighters, in Shindand district of Herat province, Afghanistan. Niazi said Sunday, May 29, 2016 it was willing to hold peace talks with the Afghan government but would demand the imposition of Islamic law and the departure of all foreign forces. (AP Photos/Allauddin Khan)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this Friday, May 27, 2016 photo, the senior leader of a breakaway faction of the Taliban Mullah Abdul Manan Niazi, second left, arrives to give a speech to his fighters, in Shindand district of Herat province, Afghanistan. Niazi said Sunday, May 29, 2016 it was willing to hold peace talks with the Afghan government but would demand the imposition of Islamic law and the departure of all foreign forces. (AP Photos/Allauddin Khan)

    In this Friday, May 27, 2016 photo, the senior leader of a breakaway faction of the Taliban Mullah Abdul Manan Niazi, second left, arrives to give a speech to his fighters, in Shindand district of Herat province, Afghanistan. Niazi said Sunday, May 29, 2016 it was willing to hold peace talks with the Afghan government but would demand the imposition of Islamic law and the departure of all foreign forces. (AP Photos/Allauddin Khan)  (The Associated Press)

A senior leader of a breakaway Taliban faction says it is willing to hold peace talks with the Afghan government but will demand the imposition of Islamic law and the departure of all foreign forces.

Mullah Abdul Manan Niazi told a group of followers on Sunday that his faction has no faith in the Kabul government but is willing to negotiate without preconditions.

Niazi is deputy to Mullah Mohammad Rasool, who split with the Taliban last summer after Mullah Akhtar Mansoor was chosen to succeed the group's late founder, Mullah Mohammad Omar. Mansoor was killed earlier this month in a U.S. drone strike in Pakistan.

The main Taliban faction has expressed similar demands, but says it will only enter talks after they have been met.