The Americas

Canadian convoy waits for dawn, hoping to flee wildfire zone

  • Evacuees leave Fort McMurray in the early morning, after being stranded north of wildfire in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada on Friday, May 6, 2016. The Alberta provincial government, which declared a state of emergency, said more than 1,100 firefighters, 145 helicopters, 138 pieces of heavy equipment and 22 air tankers were fighting the fire, but Chad Morrison, Alberta's manager of wildfire prevention, said rain is needed.  (Jason Franson/The Canadian Press via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

    Evacuees leave Fort McMurray in the early morning, after being stranded north of wildfire in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada on Friday, May 6, 2016. The Alberta provincial government, which declared a state of emergency, said more than 1,100 firefighters, 145 helicopters, 138 pieces of heavy equipment and 22 air tankers were fighting the fire, but Chad Morrison, Alberta's manager of wildfire prevention, said rain is needed. (Jason Franson/The Canadian Press via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT  (The Associated Press)

  • A bird flies over the horizen as the sun rises near a wildfire in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada on Friday, May 6, 2016. The Alberta provincial government, which declared a state of emergency, said more than 1,100 firefighters, 145 helicopters, 138 pieces of heavy equipment and 22 air tankers were fighting the fire, but Chad Morrison, Alberta's manager of wildfire prevention, said rain is needed.  (Jason Franson/The Canadian Press via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

    A bird flies over the horizen as the sun rises near a wildfire in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada on Friday, May 6, 2016. The Alberta provincial government, which declared a state of emergency, said more than 1,100 firefighters, 145 helicopters, 138 pieces of heavy equipment and 22 air tankers were fighting the fire, but Chad Morrison, Alberta's manager of wildfire prevention, said rain is needed. (Jason Franson/The Canadian Press via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT  (The Associated Press)

  • In this May 5, 2016 photo provided by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Alberta, an RCMP  officer surveys the damage on a street in fire-ravaged Fort McMurray, Alberta. More than 80,000 people have left Fort McMurray, in the heart of Canada's oil sands as a wildfire that has devastated the area exploded in size.  (Royal Canadian Mounted Police Alberta via The Canadian Press via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

    In this May 5, 2016 photo provided by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Alberta, an RCMP officer surveys the damage on a street in fire-ravaged Fort McMurray, Alberta. More than 80,000 people have left Fort McMurray, in the heart of Canada's oil sands as a wildfire that has devastated the area exploded in size. (Royal Canadian Mounted Police Alberta via The Canadian Press via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT  (The Associated Press)

Canadian officials are waiting for dawn to see whether it will be safe for a convoy of evacuees to get out of the fire-ravaged Fort McMurray area.

Gasoline tankers were being sent in to top up fuel tanks for a drive to the south.

Meanwhile, a mass airlift of evacuees was expected to resume Friday morning, a day after 8,000 people were moved out.

Officials say no deaths or injuries related to the fire have been reported.

Crews battling the fire got a little help with temperatures forecast to fall overnight to 16C (61 F) from the low 30s. But Chad Morrison of Alberta Forestry said the fire won't be quenched until there is significant rainfall.

___

Associated Press writer Rob Gillies in Toronto contributed to this report.