Asia

Massacre survivors give Indonesian gov't list of mass graves

FILE - In this Oct. 30, 1965 file photo, members of the Youth Wing of the Indonesian Communist Party (Pemuda Rakjat) are guarded by soldiers as they are taken by open truck to prison in Jakarta.  Survivors of Indonesia's anti-communist massacres in 1965 have submitted a list of what they say are more than 100 mass graves to the government after the president called for an investigation into the killings. Five survivors, aged in their 70s, who are founders of the Research Foundation for 1965 Murder Victims, gave the documents Monday, May 2, 2016,  to the Coordinating Ministry for Politics, Legal and Security Affairs. (AP Photo/File)

FILE - In this Oct. 30, 1965 file photo, members of the Youth Wing of the Indonesian Communist Party (Pemuda Rakjat) are guarded by soldiers as they are taken by open truck to prison in Jakarta. Survivors of Indonesia's anti-communist massacres in 1965 have submitted a list of what they say are more than 100 mass graves to the government after the president called for an investigation into the killings. Five survivors, aged in their 70s, who are founders of the Research Foundation for 1965 Murder Victims, gave the documents Monday, May 2, 2016, to the Coordinating Ministry for Politics, Legal and Security Affairs. (AP Photo/File)  (The Associated Press)

Survivors of Indonesia's anti-communist massacres in 1965 have submitted a list of what they say are more than 100 mass graves to the government after the president called for an investigation into the killings.

Five survivors, aged in their 70s, who are founders of the Research Foundation for 1965 Murder Victims gave the documents on Monday to the Coordinating Ministry for Politics, Legal and Security Affairs. The list is the product of research since 2000.

Security minister Luhut Pandjaitan was not on hand but his officials said he has agreed to meet with the group next week.

He has been instructed by President Joko "Jokowi" Widodo to oversee an investigation into the massacres.

Luhut, a retired general, caused a stir last month by saying very few people were killed.