US

UN envoy: America won't give up trying to find Chibok girls

  • U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power, center left, shakes hands with Nigeria's President Muhammadu Buhari, center right, after meeting at the Presidential Villa in Abuja, Nigeria, Thursday, April 21, 2016. Power is traveling to Cameroon, Chad, and Nigeria to highlight the growing threat Boko Haram poses to the Lake Chad Basin region. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

    U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power, center left, shakes hands with Nigeria's President Muhammadu Buhari, center right, after meeting at the Presidential Villa in Abuja, Nigeria, Thursday, April 21, 2016. Power is traveling to Cameroon, Chad, and Nigeria to highlight the growing threat Boko Haram poses to the Lake Chad Basin region. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)  (The Associated Press)

  • Bring Back Our Girls co-founder Obiageli Ezekwesili speaks to members of the media after meeting with U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power at the U.S. Embassy in Nigeria along with other leaders of civil society in Abuja, Nigeria, Thursday, April 21, 2016. Power is traveling to Cameroon, Chad, and Nigeria to highlight the growing threat Boko Haram poses to the Lake Chad Basin region. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

    Bring Back Our Girls co-founder Obiageli Ezekwesili speaks to members of the media after meeting with U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power at the U.S. Embassy in Nigeria along with other leaders of civil society in Abuja, Nigeria, Thursday, April 21, 2016. Power is traveling to Cameroon, Chad, and Nigeria to highlight the growing threat Boko Haram poses to the Lake Chad Basin region. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)  (The Associated Press)

  • U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power, second from right, stands next to Bring Back Our Girls co-founder Obiageli Ezekwesili, center and Aisha Yesufu, left, as she attends a Bring Back Our Girls vigil in Abuja, Nigeria, Thursday, April 21, 2016, which, two years after Boko Haram abducted the girls from their school, is still held daily. A total of 219 girls remain missing, and Power said she couldn't imagine the frustration of the families. Power is traveling to Cameroon, Chad, and Nigeria to highlight the growing threat Boko Haram poses to the Lake Chad Basin region. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

    U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power, second from right, stands next to Bring Back Our Girls co-founder Obiageli Ezekwesili, center and Aisha Yesufu, left, as she attends a Bring Back Our Girls vigil in Abuja, Nigeria, Thursday, April 21, 2016, which, two years after Boko Haram abducted the girls from their school, is still held daily. A total of 219 girls remain missing, and Power said she couldn't imagine the frustration of the families. Power is traveling to Cameroon, Chad, and Nigeria to highlight the growing threat Boko Haram poses to the Lake Chad Basin region. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)  (The Associated Press)

America's U.N. ambassador says the U.S. will never give up trying to bring home the Chibok (chih-BAWK') girls.

Two years after Boko Haram abducted the girls from their school, Samantha Power visited with those holding vigil each day in Nigeria's capital.

A total of 219 remain missing, and Power says she can't imagine the frustration of theier families.

Power says the U.S. is working with Nigeria and neighboring countries to defeat Boko Haram and safely recover them and thousands more who've been kidnapped, too.

But she acknowledges that even a superpower can't snap its fingers and make that possible.

In Abuja, Power also met President Muhammadu Buhari (moo-HAH'-mah-doo boo-HAH'-ree) and other Nigerian officials. She visits northern Nigeria, the area of Boko Haram's primary threat, on Friday.