US

Carter arrives in Iraq for talks on how to beef up IS fight

  • Defense Secretary Ash Carter arrives Monday, April 18, 2016, in Baghdad and is greeted by Lt. Gen. Sean MacFarland, top U.S. Commander for the fight against the Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria. (AP Photo/Lolita C. Baldor)

    Defense Secretary Ash Carter arrives Monday, April 18, 2016, in Baghdad and is greeted by Lt. Gen. Sean MacFarland, top U.S. Commander for the fight against the Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria. (AP Photo/Lolita C. Baldor)  (The Associated Press)

  • Visiting U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter, left, and his Iraqi counterpart Khaled al-Obeidi review an honor guard during a welcome ceremony at the Ministry of Defense, Baghdad, Iraq, Monday, April 18, 2016. (AP Photo)

    Visiting U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter, left, and his Iraqi counterpart Khaled al-Obeidi review an honor guard during a welcome ceremony at the Ministry of Defense, Baghdad, Iraq, Monday, April 18, 2016. (AP Photo)  (The Associated Press)

  • Visiting U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter, left, shakes hands with Iraqi Defense Minister Khaled al-Obeidi at the Ministry of Defense, Baghdad, Iraq, Monday, April 18, 2016. (AP Photo)

    Visiting U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter, left, shakes hands with Iraqi Defense Minister Khaled al-Obeidi at the Ministry of Defense, Baghdad, Iraq, Monday, April 18, 2016. (AP Photo)  (The Associated Press)

Defense Secretary Ash Carter has arrived in Baghdad to talk to Iraqi leaders about the next steps to beef up the Iraqi forces working to retake the northern city of Mosul.

A senior U.S. official says that as the U.S. moves to help the Iraqis, at least a "small number" of additional American forces will likely go to the warzone.

Carter has said the U.S. is considering several options, including more airstrikes, cyberattacks and American troops on the ground.

Late last month the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said he and Carter believe the number of U.S. forces in Iraq will increase in the coming weeks. Any final decision would be worked out with the Iraqi government and require President Barack Obama's approval.