Europe

Vatican secretary in leaks trial: 'Who am I to say no?'

  • Public relations expert Francesca Chaouqui, right, is accompanied by her lawyer Laura Sgro' as she arrives at the Vatican for her trial, Monday, April 11, 2016. Two Italian journalists who wrote books detailing Vatican mismanagement face trial in a Vatican courtroom along with three people accused of leaking them the information in a case that has drawn scorn from media watchdogs. (Massimo Percossi/ANSA via AP)

    Public relations expert Francesca Chaouqui, right, is accompanied by her lawyer Laura Sgro' as she arrives at the Vatican for her trial, Monday, April 11, 2016. Two Italian journalists who wrote books detailing Vatican mismanagement face trial in a Vatican courtroom along with three people accused of leaking them the information in a case that has drawn scorn from media watchdogs. (Massimo Percossi/ANSA via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • Public relations expert Francesca Chaouqui leaves the Vatican during a pause of her trial, Monday, April 11, 2016. Two Italian journalists who wrote books detailing Vatican mismanagement face trial in a Vatican courtroom along with three people accused of leaking them the information in a case that has drawn scorn from media watchdogs. (Massimo Percossi/ANSA via AP)

    Public relations expert Francesca Chaouqui leaves the Vatican during a pause of her trial, Monday, April 11, 2016. Two Italian journalists who wrote books detailing Vatican mismanagement face trial in a Vatican courtroom along with three people accused of leaking them the information in a case that has drawn scorn from media watchdogs. (Massimo Percossi/ANSA via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • Italian journalist Gianluigi Nuzzi talks to reporters as he leaves the Vatican during a pause of his trial, Monday, April 11, 2016. Two Italian journalists who wrote books detailing Vatican mismanagement face trial in a Vatican courtroom along with three people accused of leaking them the information in a case that has drawn scorn from media watchdogs. (Massimo Percossi/ANSA via AP)

    Italian journalist Gianluigi Nuzzi talks to reporters as he leaves the Vatican during a pause of his trial, Monday, April 11, 2016. Two Italian journalists who wrote books detailing Vatican mismanagement face trial in a Vatican courtroom along with three people accused of leaking them the information in a case that has drawn scorn from media watchdogs. (Massimo Percossi/ANSA via AP)  (The Associated Press)

A secretary on trial in the leaks of confidential Vatican documents has testified that he was compelled to do what his boss wanted because the monsignor reported directly to the pope and he was in no position to refuse.

Nicola Maio testified Monday that he did have legitimate access to documentation, given he was executive secretary of a papal reform commission. But he denied leaking it to two journalists, whose blockbuster books detailed waste, greed and mismanagement in the Holy See administration.

Maio said when his boss, Monsignor Angelo Lucio Vallejo Balda, asked him to get a document, he did so: "Who was I to say no?"

Vallejo has admitted he leaked the papers.

Maio, Vallejo, another commission member and two journalists face up to eight years if convicted.