Europe

The Latest: Activists stage 'Panama Papers' protest in Paris

  • Iceland's Sigurdur Ingi Johannsson, left, deputy chairman of the Progressive Party, and Bjarni Benediktsson, leader of the Independence Party attend a press conference at parliament in Reykjavik, Iceland Wednesday, April 6, 2016. Johannsson said Wednesday he will seek the president's approval to become the country's next prime minister after the previous leader resigned because of revelations he had offshore accounts. Progressive Party is in a coalition government with the Independence Party. (AP Photo/David Keyton)

    Iceland's Sigurdur Ingi Johannsson, left, deputy chairman of the Progressive Party, and Bjarni Benediktsson, leader of the Independence Party attend a press conference at parliament in Reykjavik, Iceland Wednesday, April 6, 2016. Johannsson said Wednesday he will seek the president's approval to become the country's next prime minister after the previous leader resigned because of revelations he had offshore accounts. Progressive Party is in a coalition government with the Independence Party. (AP Photo/David Keyton)  (The Associated Press)

  • Nordea bank MD Casper von Koskull reacts during a media conference in Stockholm, Sweden, Thursday April 7, 2016, in the wake of documents released by an international media probe of offshore accounts.  Koskull declared that Nordea bank are taking allegations raised by the Panama scandal seriously, and want to be very open and transparent. (Anders Wiklund / TT via AP) SWEDEN OUT

    Nordea bank MD Casper von Koskull reacts during a media conference in Stockholm, Sweden, Thursday April 7, 2016, in the wake of documents released by an international media probe of offshore accounts. Koskull declared that Nordea bank are taking allegations raised by the Panama scandal seriously, and want to be very open and transparent. (Anders Wiklund / TT via AP) SWEDEN OUT  (The Associated Press)

  • In this March 5, 2016 photo, Chinese President Xi Jinping arrives for the opening session of the annual National People's Congress in Beijing's Great Hall of the People. For graft-busting Chinese Communist Party leader Xi Jinping, recent overseas media reports showing his brother-in-law and relatives of two other members of the party’s elite inner circle owned offshore companies, often referred to as tax havens, might have been highly damaging. Instead, Xi will likely emerge unscathed as a result of his personal hold on political power, controls over free speech and the media, and a sense both among the public and potential rivals that all leading families are tainted to some degree, analysts say. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

    In this March 5, 2016 photo, Chinese President Xi Jinping arrives for the opening session of the annual National People's Congress in Beijing's Great Hall of the People. For graft-busting Chinese Communist Party leader Xi Jinping, recent overseas media reports showing his brother-in-law and relatives of two other members of the party‚Äôs elite inner circle owned offshore companies, often referred to as tax havens, might have been highly damaging. Instead, Xi will likely emerge unscathed as a result of his personal hold on political power, controls over free speech and the media, and a sense both among the public and potential rivals that all leading families are tainted to some degree, analysts say. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)  (The Associated Press)

The Latest on the publication by a coalition of media outlets of an investigation into offshore financial dealings by the rich and famous (all times local):

12:10 p.m.

Anti-fraud activists are blocking entrances at the Paris headquarters of French bank Societe Generale to protest its alleged involvement in creating offshore accounts, as detailed in the so-called "Panama Papers" reports.

Around 40 protesters physically blocked the main and side entrances of the building in central Paris on Thursday, waving banners that read "Fiscal Fraud, Social Crime."

Dominique Plihot, spokesman for the ATTAC activist group, said he was there "to create public awareness that Societe Generale was among the big banks cited in the documents" released by an international probe of offshore accounts.

French newspaper Le Monde has said the bank created hundreds of offshore companies via Panamian law firm Mossack Fonseca.

Societe Generale denies any accusations of fraud and tax evasion and repeated in a statement its commitment to the fight against such activities.