Europe

Greece, creditors resume bailout talks amid leak dispute

  • Under the watchful eye of Greek riot police officers, right, a demonstrator chants slogans during a protest against Greece's creditors in Athens, Monday, April 4, 2016, as Greece's government started new talks with bailout creditors amid a dispute over a wiretapped and leaked conversation between foreign officials involved in the Greek bailout negotiations. The main sticking points are mandated pension cuts, tax reforms and future cuts Greece must make to meet bailout targets. The country has depended on bailouts since 2010. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

    Under the watchful eye of Greek riot police officers, right, a demonstrator chants slogans during a protest against Greece's creditors in Athens, Monday, April 4, 2016, as Greece's government started new talks with bailout creditors amid a dispute over a wiretapped and leaked conversation between foreign officials involved in the Greek bailout negotiations. The main sticking points are mandated pension cuts, tax reforms and future cuts Greece must make to meet bailout targets. The country has depended on bailouts since 2010. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)  (The Associated Press)

  • Under the watchful eye of Greek riot police officers, right, demonstrators chant slogans during a protest against Greece's creditors in Athens, Monday, April 4, 2016, as Greece's government started new talks with bailout creditors amid a dispute over a wiretapped and leaked conversation between foreign officials involved in the Greek bailout negotiations. The main sticking points are mandated pension cuts, tax reforms and future cuts Greece must make to meet bailout targets. The country has depended on bailouts since 2010. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

    Under the watchful eye of Greek riot police officers, right, demonstrators chant slogans during a protest against Greece's creditors in Athens, Monday, April 4, 2016, as Greece's government started new talks with bailout creditors amid a dispute over a wiretapped and leaked conversation between foreign officials involved in the Greek bailout negotiations. The main sticking points are mandated pension cuts, tax reforms and future cuts Greece must make to meet bailout targets. The country has depended on bailouts since 2010. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)  (The Associated Press)

  • A demonstrator holding a Greek flag joins a protest against Greece's creditors in Athens, Monday, April 4, 2016, as Greece's government started new talks with bailout creditors amid a dispute over a wiretapped and leaked conversation between foreign officials involved in the Greek bailout negotiations. The main sticking points are mandated pension cuts, tax reforms and future cuts Greece must make to meet bailout targets. The country has depended on bailouts since 2010. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

    A demonstrator holding a Greek flag joins a protest against Greece's creditors in Athens, Monday, April 4, 2016, as Greece's government started new talks with bailout creditors amid a dispute over a wiretapped and leaked conversation between foreign officials involved in the Greek bailout negotiations. The main sticking points are mandated pension cuts, tax reforms and future cuts Greece must make to meet bailout targets. The country has depended on bailouts since 2010. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)  (The Associated Press)

Greece's government has started new talks with bailout creditors amid a dispute over a wiretapped and leaked conversation between foreign officials involved in the Greek bailout on the negotiations.

Finance Minister Euclid Tsakalotos is meeting representatives of Greece's European creditors and the International Monetary Fund, following a two-week Easter break.

The main sticking points are mandated pension cuts, tax reforms and future cuts Greece must make to meet bailout targets. The country has depended on bailouts since 2010.

Monday's talks were overcast by the WikiLeaks organization's weekend publication of the alleged transcript of an IMF conference call on the Greek program.

Citing the leak, Athens quickly accused the IMF of considering using a potential Greek bankruptcy to strengthen its negotiating position — which IMF head Christine Lagarde dismissed as "nonsense."