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Company apologizes for knocking down woman's home in Google Maps gaffe

DERBY, UNITED KINGDOM - SEPTEMBER 30:  Builders begin to demolish the semi-detached house at 18 Victory Road where six children died in a fire started by their parents Mick and Mairead Philpott in Allenton on September 30, 2013 in Derby, England. The Philpotts were jailed in April, along with friend Paul Mosley, after being convicted of killing the couple's six children by setting fire to the three-bedroom semi-detached house in May 2012.  (Photo by Nigel Roddis)

DERBY, UNITED KINGDOM - SEPTEMBER 30: Builders begin to demolish the semi-detached house at 18 Victory Road where six children died in a fire started by their parents Mick and Mairead Philpott in Allenton on September 30, 2013 in Derby, England. The Philpotts were jailed in April, along with friend Paul Mosley, after being convicted of killing the couple's six children by setting fire to the three-bedroom semi-detached house in May 2012. (Photo by Nigel Roddis)  (2013 Getty Images)

Lindsay Diaz and her son survived a terrifying tornado late last year only to have their Texas home mistakenly torn down by a demolition company who blamed Google Maps for the error.

"Disbelief, it's hard for me to sleep," Diaz said, according to USA Today. "It's all I think about."

Diaz and her neighbor, Alan Cutter, had been waiting on insurance and a possible FEMA assistance declaration before they began work on their duplex in Rowlett, Texas. Their homes, however, never got those repairs, but instead got the wrecking ball after Billy L. Nabors Demolition tore it down.

The Seagoville, Texas-based company said it had a permit to tear down a duplex at 7601/7603 Cousteau, but that Google Maps mistakenly took them to the wrong block.

Diaz said that after her home was mistakenly demolished, the company refused to return her phone calls.

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"In the beginning I just thought they weren't going to contact me at all,” she said. “I thought I was going to ride this out on my own."

News of the demolition, however, went viral on Facebook and Diaz said the company finally called her late last week to apologize for the incident.

"I sat down with them and we spoke with them and they sincerely apologized," Diaz said.

Nabors Demolition CEO George Gomez said his “mom and pop” business was overwhelmed by the media coverage of their gaffe and did not have a proper media relations person to deal with the incident – so at first they decided not to make any public statements.

But Gomez says it will make sure Diaz and Cutter are properly compensated for the company’s mistake.

"They promised to help and to make it right,” Diaz said. “My advice to them is to come through with that."

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