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The Latest: EU Commission: Some British proposals for EU reform are 'highly problematic'

  • Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron delivers a speech on EU reform and the UK’s renegotiation, at Chatham House in London, Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2015. Cameron on Tuesday formally launched his bid to renegotiate Britain's membership within the European Union, setting out four key demands for EU reform.(AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, pool)

    Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron delivers a speech on EU reform and the UK’s renegotiation, at Chatham House in London, Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2015. Cameron on Tuesday formally launched his bid to renegotiate Britain's membership within the European Union, setting out four key demands for EU reform.(AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, pool)  (The Associated Press)

  • German Chancellor Angela Merkel arrives for a joint press conference as part of a meeting with the President of South Africa Jacob Zuma at the chancellery in Berlin, Germany, Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2015. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)

    German Chancellor Angela Merkel arrives for a joint press conference as part of a meeting with the President of South Africa Jacob Zuma at the chancellery in Berlin, Germany, Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2015. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)  (The Associated Press)

The latest reaction to Britain's demands for European Union reform. All times local.

12:30 p.m.

The European Commission says that some of the issues raised by British Prime Minister David Cameron to reform the EU are "highly problematic."

EU Commission spokesman Margaritis Schinas said Tuesday that some of Cameron's proposals for talks to make sure that Britain stays in the EU may be feasible but insisted others ranged from "difficult to worse."

He specifically latched on to proposals where freedom of movement would be limited by allowing the U.K. to restrict benefits for migrants from other member states.

"Some things which are highly problematic as they touch upon the fundamental freedoms of our internal market, direct discrimination between EU citizens clearly falls into this last category," Schinas said.