World

Poles wait to learn if right-wing Law and Justice has enough parliament seats to govern alone

  • A cyclist drives past Law and Justice election posters, among them Beata Szydlo's first left, in Warsaw, Poland, Monday, Oct. 26, 2015. The conservative Law and Justice Party, which won Poland's general elections, has tapped Szydlo to become the nation's next prime minister, the second woman in a row to hold the post. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)

    A cyclist drives past Law and Justice election posters, among them Beata Szydlo's first left, in Warsaw, Poland, Monday, Oct. 26, 2015. The conservative Law and Justice Party, which won Poland's general elections, has tapped Szydlo to become the nation's next prime minister, the second woman in a row to hold the post. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)  (The Associated Press)

  • A woman on a  bike rides  near of  election posters depicting Law and Justice's  candidate in Lomianki near  Warsaw,  Poland, Monday, Oct. 26, 2015.According to an exit poll following the Sunday elections and released early Monday, the conservative Law and Justice won 37.7 percent of the votes, trouncing the governing pro-business Civic Platform, which took 23.6 percent. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)

    A woman on a bike rides near of election posters depicting Law and Justice's candidate in Lomianki near Warsaw, Poland, Monday, Oct. 26, 2015.According to an exit poll following the Sunday elections and released early Monday, the conservative Law and Justice won 37.7 percent of the votes, trouncing the governing pro-business Civic Platform, which took 23.6 percent. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)  (The Associated Press)

  • Women with children walk in front of an election poster depicting Law and Justice's  candidate Marek Krukowski and party's leader Jaroslaw Kaczynski,left, in Warsaw,  Poland, Monday, Oct. 26, 2015. According to an exit poll following the Sunday elections and released early Monday, the conservative Law and Justice won 37.7 percent of the votes, trouncing the governing pro-business Civic Platform, which took 23.6 percent. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)

    Women with children walk in front of an election poster depicting Law and Justice's candidate Marek Krukowski and party's leader Jaroslaw Kaczynski,left, in Warsaw, Poland, Monday, Oct. 26, 2015. According to an exit poll following the Sunday elections and released early Monday, the conservative Law and Justice won 37.7 percent of the votes, trouncing the governing pro-business Civic Platform, which took 23.6 percent. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)  (The Associated Press)

Most of the results are in for Poland's parliamentary election but the country is still waiting to learn if the winning right-wing Law and Justice party has secured a majority in the lower house of parliament.

The state election commission is to announce Tuesday afternoon how many seats each of the parties will get.

With a majority in the 460-seat body, the party would be in a position to push through its program faster and without concessions to a coalition partner.

If it falls short of a majority, the formation of a new government could take longer, and create greater political uncertainty.

Law and Justice, which mixes conservative Catholic values with vows to help the disadvantaged, won 37.6 percent of the votes in Sunday's voting.