World

2 Koreas wrap up temporary reunions of separated families as participants bid tearful farewell

  • South Korean Jong Yong-Lim, 91, holds hands of her North Korean nephew after the Separated Family Reunion Meeting at the Diamond Mountain resort in North Korea, Monday, Oct. 26, 2015. Hundreds of South Koreans crossed the border to North Korea on Saturday for the second and final round of reunions of families separated by the 1950-53 Korean War. (Kim Do-hoon/Yonhap via AP) KOREA OUT

    South Korean Jong Yong-Lim, 91, holds hands of her North Korean nephew after the Separated Family Reunion Meeting at the Diamond Mountain resort in North Korea, Monday, Oct. 26, 2015. Hundreds of South Koreans crossed the border to North Korea on Saturday for the second and final round of reunions of families separated by the 1950-53 Korean War. (Kim Do-hoon/Yonhap via AP) KOREA OUT  (The Associated Press)

  • North Korean Jong Kun Mok, left, whispers to his South Korean mother Lee Bok-soon after the Separated Family Reunion Meeting at the Diamond Mountain resort in North Korea, Monday, Oct. 26, 2015. The South Korean government says that Jong was one of more than 20 crew members of a South Korean fishing ship who were abducted by the North in 1972 while fishing near the western maritime border between the countries. Seoul believes about 500 South Koreans have been abducted by the North since the end of the war and says it has lost track of most of these people. The North denies abducting South Koreans, but has allowed some individuals Seoul says were kidnapped to meet their relatives in reunions.(Kim Do-hoon/Yonhap via AP) KOREA OUT

    North Korean Jong Kun Mok, left, whispers to his South Korean mother Lee Bok-soon after the Separated Family Reunion Meeting at the Diamond Mountain resort in North Korea, Monday, Oct. 26, 2015. The South Korean government says that Jong was one of more than 20 crew members of a South Korean fishing ship who were abducted by the North in 1972 while fishing near the western maritime border between the countries. Seoul believes about 500 South Koreans have been abducted by the North since the end of the war and says it has lost track of most of these people. The North denies abducting South Koreans, but has allowed some individuals Seoul says were kidnapped to meet their relatives in reunions.(Kim Do-hoon/Yonhap via AP) KOREA OUT  (The Associated Press)

  • North Korean Jong Kun Mok, left, weeps with his South Korean mother Lee Bok-soon after the Separated Family Reunion Meeting at the Diamond Mountain resort in North Korea, Monday, Oct. 26, 2015. The South Korean government said that Jong was one of more than 20 crew members of a South Korean fishing ship who were abducted by the North in 1972 while fishing near the western maritime border between the countries. Seoul believes about 500 South Koreans have been abducted by the North since the end of the war and says it has lost track of most of these people. The North denies abducting South Koreans, but has allowed some individuals Seoul says were kidnapped to meet their relatives in reunions.(Kim Do-hoon/Yonhap via AP) KOREA OUT

    North Korean Jong Kun Mok, left, weeps with his South Korean mother Lee Bok-soon after the Separated Family Reunion Meeting at the Diamond Mountain resort in North Korea, Monday, Oct. 26, 2015. The South Korean government said that Jong was one of more than 20 crew members of a South Korean fishing ship who were abducted by the North in 1972 while fishing near the western maritime border between the countries. Seoul believes about 500 South Koreans have been abducted by the North since the end of the war and says it has lost track of most of these people. The North denies abducting South Koreans, but has allowed some individuals Seoul says were kidnapped to meet their relatives in reunions.(Kim Do-hoon/Yonhap via AP) KOREA OUT  (The Associated Press)

Parents and children, brothers and sisters and other relatives separated by the Korean war have wept and hugged each other as they parted after brief reunions, most for the first time in more than six decades.

Monday brought the conclusion to two sets of three-day meetings at North Korea's Diamond Mountain resort.

The reunions brought together hundreds of relatives from North and South Korea who had been separated since the 1950-53 Korean War.

They won't likely see each other again because the Koreas bar ordinary citizens from visiting each other and exchanging letters and phone calls.

The reunions were highly emotional affairs, with most of the participants in their 70s or older.