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Polish PM and challenger debate ahead of election, 1st time 2 women compete for top job

  • Poland's main opposition Law and Justice party candidate for the prime minister's post, Beata Szydlo speaks to supporters during a campaign meeting in Warsaw, Poland, Saturday, Oct. 17, 2015,  ahead of the Oct. 25 parliamentary elections in Poland. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)

    Poland's main opposition Law and Justice party candidate for the prime minister's post, Beata Szydlo speaks to supporters during a campaign meeting in Warsaw, Poland, Saturday, Oct. 17, 2015, ahead of the Oct. 25 parliamentary elections in Poland. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)  (The Associated Press)

  • Polish Prime Minister Ewa Kopacz, left, speaks with Estonian Prime Minister Taavi Roivas, right, and British Prime Minister David Cameron, second left, after a group photo at an EU summit in Brussels on Thursday, Oct. 15, 2015. European Union heads of state meet Thursday to discuss, among other issues, the current migration crisis. (AP Photo/Francois Walschaerts)

    Polish Prime Minister Ewa Kopacz, left, speaks with Estonian Prime Minister Taavi Roivas, right, and British Prime Minister David Cameron, second left, after a group photo at an EU summit in Brussels on Thursday, Oct. 15, 2015. European Union heads of state meet Thursday to discuss, among other issues, the current migration crisis. (AP Photo/Francois Walschaerts)  (The Associated Press)

Poland's pro-business prime minister has faced off against her main challenger in a debate ahead of general elections this weekend — the first time two women are the top two contenders to lead the country.

The debate took place Monday evening between Prime Minister Ewa Kopacz of the pro-European Civic Platform party and Beata Szydlo of the conservative and populist Law and Justice party, which is significantly ahead in the polls.

Kopacz said a victory by Law and Justice, which promises more spending and tax cuts to help struggling Poles, would threaten Poland's finances and lead to a crisis similar to that in cash-strapped Greece.

Szydlo, in turn, accused the current government of being corrupt and ineffective and said it has failed to fight for Polish interests in Europe.