World

Turkey bans rally to by activists mourning colleagues killed in suicide bombings

  • A leftist protester runs from a barricade after protesters set it on fire, during minor clashes with Turkish security forces following a protest against Saturday's Ankara bombing attacks, in Istanbul's Gazi district, Monday, Oct. 12, 2015. Turkish investigators were close to identifying one of the suicide bombers in Turkey's deadliest attacks in years, Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu said Monday. (AP Photo/Cagdas Erdogan)

    A leftist protester runs from a barricade after protesters set it on fire, during minor clashes with Turkish security forces following a protest against Saturday's Ankara bombing attacks, in Istanbul's Gazi district, Monday, Oct. 12, 2015. Turkish investigators were close to identifying one of the suicide bombers in Turkey's deadliest attacks in years, Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu said Monday. (AP Photo/Cagdas Erdogan)  (The Associated Press)

  • Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu and his wife Sare Davutoglu arrive to offer carnations at the site of an explosion in Ankara, Turkey, Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2015. Authorities in Istanbul banned a protest rally and march by the same trade union and civic society groups who lost friends and colleagues in Turkey's bloodiest terror attack. Dogan news agency video footage on Tuesday showed police pushing back dozens of demonstrators trying to reach the rally to commemorate the 97 victims of the twin suicide bombings. Some demonstrators were detained. (Hakan Goktepe/Prime Ministry Press Service via AP, Pool)

    Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu and his wife Sare Davutoglu arrive to offer carnations at the site of an explosion in Ankara, Turkey, Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2015. Authorities in Istanbul banned a protest rally and march by the same trade union and civic society groups who lost friends and colleagues in Turkey's bloodiest terror attack. Dogan news agency video footage on Tuesday showed police pushing back dozens of demonstrators trying to reach the rally to commemorate the 97 victims of the twin suicide bombings. Some demonstrators were detained. (Hakan Goktepe/Prime Ministry Press Service via AP, Pool)  (The Associated Press)

  • Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu and his wife Sare Davutoglu leave carnations at the site of an explosion in Ankara, Turkey, Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2015. Authorities in Istanbul banned a protest rally and march by the same trade union and civic society groups who lost friends and colleagues in Turkey's bloodiest terror attack. Dogan news agency video footage on Tuesday showed police pushing back dozens of demonstrators trying to reach the rally to commemorate the 97 victims of the twin suicide bombings. Some demonstrators were detained. (Mustafa Aktas/Prime Ministry Press Service via AP, Pool)

    Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu and his wife Sare Davutoglu leave carnations at the site of an explosion in Ankara, Turkey, Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2015. Authorities in Istanbul banned a protest rally and march by the same trade union and civic society groups who lost friends and colleagues in Turkey's bloodiest terror attack. Dogan news agency video footage on Tuesday showed police pushing back dozens of demonstrators trying to reach the rally to commemorate the 97 victims of the twin suicide bombings. Some demonstrators were detained. (Mustafa Aktas/Prime Ministry Press Service via AP, Pool)  (The Associated Press)

Authorities in Istanbul have banned a protest rally and march by the same trade union and civic society groups who lost friends and colleagues in Turkey's bloodiest terror attack.

Dogan news agency video footage on Tuesday showed police pushing back dozens of demonstrators trying to reach the rally to commemorate the 97 victims of the twin suicide bombings. Some demonstrators were detained.

A woman demonstrator was heard shouting: "Our brothers were killed! What are you doing?"

The Istanbul governor banned the protest citing "sensitivities at this time" and the fact that the routes demonstrators planned to march along were heavily used by the public.

The bombings increased political uncertainty ahead of Turkey's Nov. 1 election and raised fears that the country may be heading toward a period of instability.