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Russian missile-maker says its own MH17 crash investigation contradicts Dutch report.

  • With the reconstructed cockpit displayed behind, Tjibbe Joustra, head of the Dutch Safety Board presents the board’s final report into what caused Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 to break up high over Eastern Ukraine last year, killing all 298 people on board, during a press conference in Gilze-Rijen, central Netherlands, Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2015. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

    With the reconstructed cockpit displayed behind, Tjibbe Joustra, head of the Dutch Safety Board presents the board’s final report into what caused Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 to break up high over Eastern Ukraine last year, killing all 298 people on board, during a press conference in Gilze-Rijen, central Netherlands, Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2015. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)  (The Associated Press)

  • A video show the launch of a BUK missile, while a part of the reconstructed forward section of the fuselage is displayed behind, as Tjibbe Joustra, left, head of the Dutch Safety Board presents the board’s final report into what caused Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 to break up high over Eastern Ukraine last year, killing all 298 people on board, during a press conference in Gilze-Rijen, central Netherlands, Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2015. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

    A video show the launch of a BUK missile, while a part of the reconstructed forward section of the fuselage is displayed behind, as Tjibbe Joustra, left, head of the Dutch Safety Board presents the board’s final report into what caused Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 to break up high over Eastern Ukraine last year, killing all 298 people on board, during a press conference in Gilze-Rijen, central Netherlands, Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2015. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)  (The Associated Press)

  • Almaz-Antei director Yan Novikov, center, looks at the screen during a news conference in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2015. Almaz-Antei air defense consortium, the builder of Buk missiles, presented its vision of the MH-17 air crash based on a new modeling of the disaster they recently conducted. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

    Almaz-Antei director Yan Novikov, center, looks at the screen during a news conference in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2015. Almaz-Antei air defense consortium, the builder of Buk missiles, presented its vision of the MH-17 air crash based on a new modeling of the disaster they recently conducted. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)  (The Associated Press)

A Russian state-controlled missile-maker says its own investigation of last year's crash of the MH17 airliner over rebel eastern Ukraine contradicts conclusions from a Dutch probe.

Results of the Dutch investigation are to be released later Tuesday. Yan Novikov, head of the Russian Almaz-Antey concern, speaking at a news conference, did not specify what was in the report and he did not say whether he had been given an advance look.

The Malaysian airliner crashed July 17, 2014, in rebel-controlled eastern Ukraine and is widely believed to have been shot down by a surface-to-air missile. Ukraine and Western countries contend the missile was fired by Russian troops or Russian-backed separatists.