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Dictator Marcos' son says human rights violations no longer a concern for Filipinos

  • Philippine Senator Ferdinand "Bongbong" Marcos Jr. gestures during a media forum Wednesday, Oct.7, 2015, two days after announcing he is seeking the nation’s second highest office in next year’s national elections, at suburban Quezon city northeast of Manila, Philippines. Marcos Jr., the son of the late strongman Ferdinand Marcos,  said that Filipinos are no longer concerned with abuses committed under his father’s rule, angering human rights activists who say he wants people to forget his father’s strongman rule that a popular revolt ended 29 years ago. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

    Philippine Senator Ferdinand "Bongbong" Marcos Jr. gestures during a media forum Wednesday, Oct.7, 2015, two days after announcing he is seeking the nation’s second highest office in next year’s national elections, at suburban Quezon city northeast of Manila, Philippines. Marcos Jr., the son of the late strongman Ferdinand Marcos, said that Filipinos are no longer concerned with abuses committed under his father’s rule, angering human rights activists who say he wants people to forget his father’s strongman rule that a popular revolt ended 29 years ago. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)  (The Associated Press)

  • Philippine Senator Ferdinand "Bongbong" Marcos Jr. arrives for a media forum Wednesday, Oct.7, 2015, two days after announcing he is seeking the nation’s second highest office in next year’s national elections, at suburban Quezon city northeast of Manila, Philippines. Marcos Jr., the son of the late strongman Ferdinand Marcos,  said that Filipinos are no longer concerned with abuses committed under his father’s rule, angering human rights activists who say he wants people to forget his father’s strongman rule that a popular revolt ended 29 years ago. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

    Philippine Senator Ferdinand "Bongbong" Marcos Jr. arrives for a media forum Wednesday, Oct.7, 2015, two days after announcing he is seeking the nation’s second highest office in next year’s national elections, at suburban Quezon city northeast of Manila, Philippines. Marcos Jr., the son of the late strongman Ferdinand Marcos, said that Filipinos are no longer concerned with abuses committed under his father’s rule, angering human rights activists who say he wants people to forget his father’s strongman rule that a popular revolt ended 29 years ago. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)  (The Associated Press)

  • Philippine Senator Ferdinand "Bongbong" Marcos Jr. poses for selfie with supporters following a media forum Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015, two days after announcing he is seeking the nation’s second highest office in next year’s national elections, at suburban Quezon city northeast of Manila, Philippines. Marcos Jr., the son of the late strongman  Ferdinand Marcos,  said that Filipinos are no longer concerned with abuses committed under his father’s rule, angering human rights activists who say he wants people to forget his father’s strongman rule that a popular revolt ended 29 years ago. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

    Philippine Senator Ferdinand "Bongbong" Marcos Jr. poses for selfie with supporters following a media forum Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015, two days after announcing he is seeking the nation’s second highest office in next year’s national elections, at suburban Quezon city northeast of Manila, Philippines. Marcos Jr., the son of the late strongman Ferdinand Marcos, said that Filipinos are no longer concerned with abuses committed under his father’s rule, angering human rights activists who say he wants people to forget his father’s strongman rule that a popular revolt ended 29 years ago. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)  (The Associated Press)

The son of late dictator Ferdinand Marcos says Filipinos are no longer concerned about human rights abuses committed under his father's rule, angering activists who say he wants people to forget his father's strongman rule, which a popular revolt ended 29 years ago.

Speaking to reporters two days after announcing he is seeking the vice presidency in next year's elections, Ferdinand Marcos Jr. said Wednesday that Filipinos these days are more concerned about their livelihood, crime and other day-to-day problems.

Retired Commission on Human Rights Chairwoman Loretta Ann Rosales, who was tortured and detained during Marcos' martial rule, says his son, a senator, and his widow, a congresswoman, were glossing over a law passed in 2013 recognizing and compensating victims of human rights abuses during his 14-year rule.