World

David Cameron says he's not attached to EU, will work only for UK interest

  • Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron, right and his wife Samantha make their way to the conference hall before his keynote speech at the annual Conservative Party Conference in Manchester, England, Wednesday Oct. 7, 2015. (AP Photo/Jon Super)

    Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron, right and his wife Samantha make their way to the conference hall before his keynote speech at the annual Conservative Party Conference in Manchester, England, Wednesday Oct. 7, 2015. (AP Photo/Jon Super)  (The Associated Press)

  • Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron makes his keynote speech at the annual Conservative Party Conference in Manchester, England, Wednesday Oct. 7, 2015.  Cameron gave a bullish speech Wednesday to Conservative Party faithful, still buoyed by his resounding May election victory.(AP Photo/Jon Super)

    Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron makes his keynote speech at the annual Conservative Party Conference in Manchester, England, Wednesday Oct. 7, 2015. Cameron gave a bullish speech Wednesday to Conservative Party faithful, still buoyed by his resounding May election victory.(AP Photo/Jon Super)  (The Associated Press)

  • Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron makes his keynote speech at the annual Conservative Party Conference in Manchester, England, Wednesday Oct. 7, 2015.  Cameron gave a bullish speech Wednesday to Conservative Party faithful, still buoyed by his resounding May election victory. (AP Photo/Jon Super)

    Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron makes his keynote speech at the annual Conservative Party Conference in Manchester, England, Wednesday Oct. 7, 2015. Cameron gave a bullish speech Wednesday to Conservative Party faithful, still buoyed by his resounding May election victory. (AP Photo/Jon Super)  (The Associated Press)

Prime Minister David Cameron says he has "no sentimental attachment" to the European Union and will refashion relations with the bloc in Britain's economic interest.

In a bullish speech Wednesday to Conservative Party faithful following his resounding election victory, Cameron said he was "only interested in two things: Britain's prosperity and Britain's influence."

In May, Cameron's party defied poll predictions by winning a majority of House of Commons seats, making him the first head of an all-Conservative government in almost two decades.

He said he would deliver "greater hope, greater chances, greater security" to Britain before stepping down before the next election in 2020.

The Conservative conference has seen several politicians emerge as potential successors, including Treasury chief George Osborne, Home Secretary Theresa May and London Mayor Boris Johnson.