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Human rights commission pushes special prosecutor for case of Mexico's 43 missing students

  • A man holds a banner that reads in Spanish "Justice," as he pays his respects at a newly erected momument at the place where Julio Cesar Mondragon's body was found, during a march by parents and relatives of 43 missing students and 3 who were killed, in Iguala, Guerrero State, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 27, 2015. One day after marking the one-year anniversary of the students disappearance with a march in Mexico City, relatives and current Ayotzinapa students visited Iguala to march and place flowers and candles on two new monuments to the students who were killed.(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

    A man holds a banner that reads in Spanish "Justice," as he pays his respects at a newly erected momument at the place where Julio Cesar Mondragon's body was found, during a march by parents and relatives of 43 missing students and 3 who were killed, in Iguala, Guerrero State, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 27, 2015. One day after marking the one-year anniversary of the students disappearance with a march in Mexico City, relatives and current Ayotzinapa students visited Iguala to march and place flowers and candles on two new monuments to the students who were killed.(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)  (The Associated Press)

  • A flower rests next to hands reaching upward on a newly erected monument for two of three students killed on the day 43 others disappeared just over a year ago, in Iguala, Guerrero State, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 27, 2015. One day after marking the one-year anniversary of the students disappearance with a march in Mexico City, relatives and current Ayotzinapa students visited Iguala to march and place flowers and candles on two new monuments to the students who were killed. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

    A flower rests next to hands reaching upward on a newly erected monument for two of three students killed on the day 43 others disappeared just over a year ago, in Iguala, Guerrero State, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 27, 2015. One day after marking the one-year anniversary of the students disappearance with a march in Mexico City, relatives and current Ayotzinapa students visited Iguala to march and place flowers and candles on two new monuments to the students who were killed. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)  (The Associated Press)

  • Offerings adorn the spot where Julio Cesar Mondragon's body was found, after parents and relatives of 43 missing students and three who were killed visited a newly erected momument to Mondragon at the road's edge, in Iguala, Guerrero State, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 27, 2015. One day after marking the one-year anniversary of the students disappearance with a march in Mexico City, relatives and current Ayotzinapa students visited Iguala to march and place flowers and candles on two new monuments to the students who were killed.(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

    Offerings adorn the spot where Julio Cesar Mondragon's body was found, after parents and relatives of 43 missing students and three who were killed visited a newly erected momument to Mondragon at the road's edge, in Iguala, Guerrero State, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 27, 2015. One day after marking the one-year anniversary of the students disappearance with a march in Mexico City, relatives and current Ayotzinapa students visited Iguala to march and place flowers and candles on two new monuments to the students who were killed.(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)  (The Associated Press)

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights is urging Mexico to appoint a special prosecutor to handle the case of 43 missing college students whose fate remains a mystery a year after they disappeared at the hands of local police and a drug gang.

Commission President Rose-Marie Belle Antoine says Mexico must implement all recommendations of the commission's independent team of experts, including replacing the investigative team and following the experts' hypothesis that the students may have disappeared while hijacking a bus carrying heroin or drug money.

The experts took apart the Attorney General's version that the students were mistaken for rival gang members and burned in a garbage dump.

Antoine spoke Friday, saying Mexico is experiencing a "serious human right crisis."

The Mexican government denied it has a widespread crisis.