World

US pitches investors on Afghan military airfields ahead of coming drawdown, despite insurgency

  • Daoud Sultanzoy, an adviser to Afghan President Ashraf Ghani, speaks to The Associated Press on the sidelines of an investment meeting on Afghanistan's military airfields on Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2015, in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Sultanzoy and U.S. officials are pitching private investors on the idea of doing business in the country’s many military airfields ahead of a planned foreign troop withdrawal, even as the Taliban insurgency rages on. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

    Daoud Sultanzoy, an adviser to Afghan President Ashraf Ghani, speaks to The Associated Press on the sidelines of an investment meeting on Afghanistan's military airfields on Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2015, in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Sultanzoy and U.S. officials are pitching private investors on the idea of doing business in the country’s many military airfields ahead of a planned foreign troop withdrawal, even as the Taliban insurgency rages on. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)  (The Associated Press)

  • Daoud Sultanzoy, an adviser to Afghan President Ashraf Ghani, speaks during an investment meeting on Afghanistan's military airfields on Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2015, in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Sultanzoy and U.S. officials are pitching private investors on the idea of doing business in the country’s many military airfields ahead of a planned foreign troop withdrawal, even as the Taliban insurgency rages on. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

    Daoud Sultanzoy, an adviser to Afghan President Ashraf Ghani, speaks during an investment meeting on Afghanistan's military airfields on Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2015, in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Sultanzoy and U.S. officials are pitching private investors on the idea of doing business in the country’s many military airfields ahead of a planned foreign troop withdrawal, even as the Taliban insurgency rages on. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)  (The Associated Press)

  • Major General Todd Semonite, Comanding General of Combined Security Transition Command - Afghanistan talks during tan investment meeting on Afghanistan's military airfields on Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2015, in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Afghan and U.S. officials are pitching private investors on the idea of doing business in the country’s many military airfields ahead of a planned foreign troop withdrawal, even as the Taliban insurgency rages on. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

    Major General Todd Semonite, Comanding General of Combined Security Transition Command - Afghanistan talks during tan investment meeting on Afghanistan's military airfields on Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2015, in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Afghan and U.S. officials are pitching private investors on the idea of doing business in the country’s many military airfields ahead of a planned foreign troop withdrawal, even as the Taliban insurgency rages on. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)  (The Associated Press)

U.S. military and Afghan officials are pitching private investors on the idea of doing business in Afghanistan's many military airfields ahead of a planned foreign troop drawdown, even as the Taliban insurgency rages on.

The American Chamber of Commerce in Afghanistan hosted a meeting on Wednesday in Dubai to bring potential investors together. The airfields, worth billions, are spread throughout Afghanistan.

The meeting came as Afghan forces aided by U.S. airstrikes targeted the Taliban in Kunduz. The insurgents seized the city Monday, the first they've taken since the 2001 U.S.-led invasion.

U.S. Army Maj. Gen. Todd Semonite told The Associated Press that "there will be insurgents over time that can continue to mass ... but the Afghan defense forces are able to come back in and retake those areas."