World

China urges return to six-party talks over N. Korean nuclear program

  • Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi speaks at an event to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 19th joint statement agreed as part of the six-party talks on North Korea's nuclear program at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing, Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015. Yi said Saturday that the multilateral talks involving China, the United States, Russia, Japan, South Korea and North Korea are still the best way to address the nuclear issue on the Korean Peninsula. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

    Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi speaks at an event to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 19th joint statement agreed as part of the six-party talks on North Korea's nuclear program at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing, Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015. Yi said Saturday that the multilateral talks involving China, the United States, Russia, Japan, South Korea and North Korea are still the best way to address the nuclear issue on the Korean Peninsula. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)  (The Associated Press)

  • Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, center, arrives at an event to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 19th joint statement agreed as part of the six-party talks on North Korea's nuclear program at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing, Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015. Yi said Saturday that the multilateral talks involving China, the United States, Russia, Japan, South Korea and North Korea are still the best way to address the nuclear issue on the Korean Peninsula. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

    Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, center, arrives at an event to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 19th joint statement agreed as part of the six-party talks on North Korea's nuclear program at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing, Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015. Yi said Saturday that the multilateral talks involving China, the United States, Russia, Japan, South Korea and North Korea are still the best way to address the nuclear issue on the Korean Peninsula. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)  (The Associated Press)

  • Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi gestures to a member of the audience at an event to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 19th joint statement agreed as part of the six-party talks on North Korea's nuclear program at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing, Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015. Yi said Saturday that the multilateral talks involving China, the United States, Russia, Japan, South Korea and North Korea are still the best way to address the nuclear issue on the Korean Peninsula. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

    Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi gestures to a member of the audience at an event to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 19th joint statement agreed as part of the six-party talks on North Korea's nuclear program at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing, Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015. Yi said Saturday that the multilateral talks involving China, the United States, Russia, Japan, South Korea and North Korea are still the best way to address the nuclear issue on the Korean Peninsula. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)  (The Associated Press)

Beijing is urging the countries involved in talks on ending North Korea's nuclear program to resume negotiations that stalled seven years ago.

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi said Saturday that the multilateral talks involving China, the United States, Russia, Japan, South Korea and North Korea are still the best way to address the nuclear issue on the Korean Peninsula.

He made the remarks at a symposium commemorating the 10th anniversary of a joint statement by the six-party talks. The talks collapsed in 2008, when North Korea refused inspections and declared the deal void.

North Korea conducted a long-range missile launch in late 2012, and another nuclear test in early 2013.

Pyongyang has signaled possible plans to launch a satellite and prepare a nuclear test explosion.