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Mexican attorney general's office holds tight to story that students incinerated at dump

Parents of the 43 teachers' college students hold up images of their missing sons as they listen in to a conference in Mexico City, Sunday, Sept. 5, 2015. An independent report presented Sunday dismantled the Mexican government's investigation into last year's disappearance of the 43 students, saying the prosecutor's contention that they were incinerated in a giant pyre never happened and fueling the anger of parents who still don't know what happened to their sons. (AP Photo/Emilio Espejel)

Parents of the 43 teachers' college students hold up images of their missing sons as they listen in to a conference in Mexico City, Sunday, Sept. 5, 2015. An independent report presented Sunday dismantled the Mexican government's investigation into last year's disappearance of the 43 students, saying the prosecutor's contention that they were incinerated in a giant pyre never happened and fueling the anger of parents who still don't know what happened to their sons. (AP Photo/Emilio Espejel)  (The Associated Press)

Mexico's attorney general's office remains convinced that at least many of the 43 students who disappeared in 2014 were killed and incinerated at a garbage dump, despite an independent expert's report that said it did not happen.

Tomas Zeron, the director of its criminal investigation agency, said Monday that their more than 100 investigators could not be mistaken. For that reason it remains their principal line of investigation.

Zeron said they could have some error, but were confident about the forensic science.

Francisco Cox, one of the experts from the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, told Milenio television it is possible the students were burned elsewhere, but not at the dump.

On Sunday, Attorney General Arely Gomez said she would order a new examination of what happened at the dump.