World

Meeting in Japan on Pacific bluefin tuna ends without fresh moves to protect depleted species

  • FILE - In this Jan. 5, 2015, file photo, prospective buyers inspect the quality of frozen tuna before the first auction of the year at Tsukiji fish market in Tokyo. An international body that monitors fisheries in most of the Pacific Ocean ended a meeting in Japan Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015, without agreement on fresh measures to protect the dwindling bluefin tuna. The Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission was unable to get a consensus on either short term or long term measures to help restore the population of the bluefin, whose population has fallen 96 percent from unfished levels, according to a release by the group. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)

    FILE - In this Jan. 5, 2015, file photo, prospective buyers inspect the quality of frozen tuna before the first auction of the year at Tsukiji fish market in Tokyo. An international body that monitors fisheries in most of the Pacific Ocean ended a meeting in Japan Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015, without agreement on fresh measures to protect the dwindling bluefin tuna. The Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission was unable to get a consensus on either short term or long term measures to help restore the population of the bluefin, whose population has fallen 96 percent from unfished levels, according to a release by the group. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Jan. 5, 2015 file photo, prospective buyers inspect the quality of fresh tuna before the first auction of the year at Tsukiji fish market in Tokyo. An international body that monitors fisheries in most of the Pacific Ocean ended a meeting in Japan Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015, without agreement on fresh measures to protect the dwindling bluefin tuna. The Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission was unable to get a consensus on either short term or long term measures to help restore the population of the bluefin, whose population has fallen 96 percent from unfished levels, according to a release by the group. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)

    FILE - In this Jan. 5, 2015 file photo, prospective buyers inspect the quality of fresh tuna before the first auction of the year at Tsukiji fish market in Tokyo. An international body that monitors fisheries in most of the Pacific Ocean ended a meeting in Japan Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015, without agreement on fresh measures to protect the dwindling bluefin tuna. The Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission was unable to get a consensus on either short term or long term measures to help restore the population of the bluefin, whose population has fallen 96 percent from unfished levels, according to a release by the group. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)  (The Associated Press)

An international body that monitors fisheries in most of the Pacific Ocean has ended a meeting in Japan without agreement on fresh measures to protect the dwindling bluefin tuna.

The Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission was unable to get a consensus on either short term or long term measures to help restore the population of the bluefin, whose population has fallen 96 percent from unfished levels, according to a release by the group.

Last year, the 10-nation commission recommended that the catch of juvenile tuna be cut to half of its average level in 2002-2004. But conservation groups say more must be done to counter the species' sharp decline.