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Police say Bangkok bombing suspect appears to be lying, not cooperating with authorities

  • This image released Sunday, Aug. 30, 2015, by the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) shows evidence government officials say was collected in conjunction with the arrest of a man they say was involved with the Aug. 17 bombing at the Erawan Shrine in Bangkok. Thai authorities arrested a foreign man they said had been holed up in a suburban apartment with bomb-making equipment and stacks of passports, the first possible breakthrough in the deadly bombing at a Bangkok shrine nearly two weeks ago.(National Council for Peace and Order via AP)

    This image released Sunday, Aug. 30, 2015, by the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) shows evidence government officials say was collected in conjunction with the arrest of a man they say was involved with the Aug. 17 bombing at the Erawan Shrine in Bangkok. Thai authorities arrested a foreign man they said had been holed up in a suburban apartment with bomb-making equipment and stacks of passports, the first possible breakthrough in the deadly bombing at a Bangkok shrine nearly two weeks ago.(National Council for Peace and Order via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • This image released Sunday, Aug. 30, 2015, by the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) shows evidence government officials say was collected in conjunction with the arrest of a man they say was involved with the Aug. 17 bombing at the Erawan Shrine in Bangkok. Thai authorities arrested a foreign man they said had been holed up in a suburban apartment with bomb-making equipment and stacks of passports, the first possible breakthrough in the deadly bombing at a Bangkok shrine nearly two weeks ago. (National Council for Peace and Order via AP)

    This image released Sunday, Aug. 30, 2015, by the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) shows evidence government officials say was collected in conjunction with the arrest of a man they say was involved with the Aug. 17 bombing at the Erawan Shrine in Bangkok. Thai authorities arrested a foreign man they said had been holed up in a suburban apartment with bomb-making equipment and stacks of passports, the first possible breakthrough in the deadly bombing at a Bangkok shrine nearly two weeks ago. (National Council for Peace and Order via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • This image released Sunday, Aug. 30, 2015, by the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) shows evidence government officials say was collected in conjunction with the arrest of a man they say was involved with the Aug. 17 bombing at the Erawan Shrine in Bangkok. Thai authorities arrested a foreign man they said had been holed up in a suburban apartment with bomb-making equipment and stacks of passports, the first possible breakthrough in the deadly bombing at a Bangkok shrine nearly two weeks ago. (National Council for Peace and Order via AP)

    This image released Sunday, Aug. 30, 2015, by the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) shows evidence government officials say was collected in conjunction with the arrest of a man they say was involved with the Aug. 17 bombing at the Erawan Shrine in Bangkok. Thai authorities arrested a foreign man they said had been holed up in a suburban apartment with bomb-making equipment and stacks of passports, the first possible breakthrough in the deadly bombing at a Bangkok shrine nearly two weeks ago. (National Council for Peace and Order via AP)  (The Associated Press)

Thai police say the man arrested in connection with Bangkok's deadly bombing was being uncooperative and appeared to be lying during questioning and would remain in military custody for at least seven days.

National police spokesman Prawuth Thavornsiri said Sunday that authorities "think he is not telling us the truth."

The unnamed foreigner was arrested Saturday after police raided an apartment he was in where they found bomb-making equipment and fake passports.

It was the first possible breakthrough in the investigation into the Aug. 17 blast at the Erawan Shrine, which killed 20 people, more than half of whom were foreigners, and injured more than 120 people.

Prawuth said his nationality and motive were still not known.