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Lawmakers urge congress to lift Guatemalan president's immunity from prosecution

  • Members of the commission that will decide whether to remove Guatemalan President Otto Perez Molina’s immunity listen to special prosecutors from the Attorney General's office, in Guatemala City, Friday, Aug. 28, 2015. The commission has decided call Perez Molina to appear before the body as a corruption scandal swirls around his government. (AP Photo/Luis Soto)

    Members of the commission that will decide whether to remove Guatemalan President Otto Perez Molina‚Äôs immunity listen to special prosecutors from the Attorney General's office, in Guatemala City, Friday, Aug. 28, 2015. The commission has decided call Perez Molina to appear before the body as a corruption scandal swirls around his government. (AP Photo/Luis Soto)  (The Associated Press)

  • Holding a Guatemalan national flag, a boy walks with his family to join a protest demanding the resignation of Guatemala's President Otto Perez Molina outside the Congress building, in Guatemala City, Saturday, Aug. 29, 2015. Perez Molina failed to appear before a congressional commission investigating whether to lift his immunity from prosecution in a corruption case involving his government. The Guatemalan leader opted to send his personal attorney Saturday with a written declaration. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

    Holding a Guatemalan national flag, a boy walks with his family to join a protest demanding the resignation of Guatemala's President Otto Perez Molina outside the Congress building, in Guatemala City, Saturday, Aug. 29, 2015. Perez Molina failed to appear before a congressional commission investigating whether to lift his immunity from prosecution in a corruption case involving his government. The Guatemalan leader opted to send his personal attorney Saturday with a written declaration. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)  (The Associated Press)

  • Demonstrators hold a signs showing the likeness of Guatemala's President Otto Perez Molina, left, former Vice President Roxana Baldetti, center, and Manuel Baldizon, the presidential candidate for the opposition party Renewed Democratic Freedom, during a national strike calling for Guatemalan President Otto Perez Molina's resignation, in Guatemala City, Thursday, Aug. 27, 2015. The signs read in Spanish "Resign!" as pressure grew on the embattled president to resign as business and government offices closed, and thousands gathered in the capital's central square. The attorney general's office urged Perez Molina, late Wednesday, to step down "to prevent ungovernability that could destabilize the nation." (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

    Demonstrators hold a signs showing the likeness of Guatemala's President Otto Perez Molina, left, former Vice President Roxana Baldetti, center, and Manuel Baldizon, the presidential candidate for the opposition party Renewed Democratic Freedom, during a national strike calling for Guatemalan President Otto Perez Molina's resignation, in Guatemala City, Thursday, Aug. 27, 2015. The signs read in Spanish "Resign!" as pressure grew on the embattled president to resign as business and government offices closed, and thousands gathered in the capital's central square. The attorney general's office urged Perez Molina, late Wednesday, to step down "to prevent ungovernability that could destabilize the nation." (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)  (The Associated Press)

A congressional commission in Guatemala is urging the full congress to lift President Otto Perez Molina's immunity from prosecution in a corruption case.

Saturday's vote by the five-person committee came after the president failed to appear in person, as summoned.

The process against Perez Molina is akin to impeachment and could lead to criminal charges in connection with a customs fraud scheme.

Former Vice President Roxana Baldetti was ordered jailed on Wednesday on charges she took $3.7 million in bribes to let business people evade import duties.

The president's four-year term ends on Jan. 14, 2016, and elections will be held in early September to pick his successor.