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Hezbollah ministers, allies storm out of Lebanese Cabinet meeting over growing trash crisis

  • A Lebanese policeman passes by an empty chair, that protesters placed to represent the presidential vacuum, in front of a concrete wall installed by authorities near the main Lebanese government building, in downtown Beirut, Lebanon, Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015. Anticipating more protests, authorities installed a concrete wall near the main Lebanese government building, site of the largest protests. On Saturday and Sunday nights, police fired tear gas and water cannons at the protesters, battling them in the streets of Beirut in dramatic clashes, wounding dozens. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)

    A Lebanese policeman passes by an empty chair, that protesters placed to represent the presidential vacuum, in front of a concrete wall installed by authorities near the main Lebanese government building, in downtown Beirut, Lebanon, Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015. Anticipating more protests, authorities installed a concrete wall near the main Lebanese government building, site of the largest protests. On Saturday and Sunday nights, police fired tear gas and water cannons at the protesters, battling them in the streets of Beirut in dramatic clashes, wounding dozens. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)  (The Associated Press)

  • A Lebanese man takes a photograph through a concrete wall installed by authorities near the main Lebanese government building, in downtown Beirut, Lebanon, Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015. Anticipating more protests, authorities installed a concrete wall near the main Lebanese government building, site of the largest protests. On Saturday and Sunday nights, police fired tear gas and water cannons at the protesters, battling them in the streets of Beirut in dramatic clashes, wounding dozens. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)

    A Lebanese man takes a photograph through a concrete wall installed by authorities near the main Lebanese government building, in downtown Beirut, Lebanon, Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015. Anticipating more protests, authorities installed a concrete wall near the main Lebanese government building, site of the largest protests. On Saturday and Sunday nights, police fired tear gas and water cannons at the protesters, battling them in the streets of Beirut in dramatic clashes, wounding dozens. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)  (The Associated Press)

  • Lebanese women have their picture taken in front a concrete wall installed by authorities near the main Lebanese government building, in downtown Beirut, Lebanon, Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015. Anticipating more protests, authorities installed a concrete wall near the main Lebanese government building, site of the largest protests. On Saturday and Sunday nights, police fired tear gas and water cannons at the protesters, battling them in the streets of Beirut in dramatic clashes, wounding dozens. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)

    Lebanese women have their picture taken in front a concrete wall installed by authorities near the main Lebanese government building, in downtown Beirut, Lebanon, Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015. Anticipating more protests, authorities installed a concrete wall near the main Lebanese government building, site of the largest protests. On Saturday and Sunday nights, police fired tear gas and water cannons at the protesters, battling them in the streets of Beirut in dramatic clashes, wounding dozens. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)  (The Associated Press)

Ministers of the Hezbollah group and its allies have walked out of a Lebanese Cabinet meeting meant to discuss the country's worsening garbage crisis, reflecting the government's lingering dysfunction despite mass protests.

Prime Minister Tammam Salam had called for the emergency meeting after a weekend of clashes between security forces and demonstrators protesting against corruption and poor public services.

The six ministers withdrew four hours into the meeting on Tuesday. Foreign Minister Gibran Bassil said he was pulling out because of a "theater" being performed with regards to the trash issue.

Lebanon's multi-sectarian power-sharing government has been without a president for more than a year, and parliament has extended its term twice without elections.