World

North Korea denies role in mine blasts near border that maimed 2 South Korean soldiers

  • Small screens show South Korean President Park Geun-hye as participants listen to her speech during a ceremony to celebrate Korean Liberation Day from Japanese colonial rule in 1945, at Seong Cultural Center in Seoul, South Korea, Saturday, Aug. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

    Small screens show South Korean President Park Geun-hye as participants listen to her speech during a ceremony to celebrate Korean Liberation Day from Japanese colonial rule in 1945, at Seong Cultural Center in Seoul, South Korea, Saturday, Aug. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)  (The Associated Press)

  • South Korean President Park Geun-hye delivers a speech during a ceremony to celebrate Korean Liberation Day from Japanese colonial rule in 1945, at Seong Cultural Center in Seoul, South Korea, Saturday, Aug. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

    South Korean President Park Geun-hye delivers a speech during a ceremony to celebrate Korean Liberation Day from Japanese colonial rule in 1945, at Seong Cultural Center in Seoul, South Korea, Saturday, Aug. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Aug. 11, 2015, file photo, members of South Korean conservative group shout slogans after burning an effigy of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and North Korean flags during a rally denouncing the North Korea at the Imjingak Pavilion near the border village of Panmunjom in Paju, South Korea. North Korea on Saturday, Aug. 15, 2015, threatened to attack South Korean loudspeakers that are broadcasting anti-Pyongyang propaganda messages across their shared border, the world's most heavily armed. The warning follows Pyongyang's earlier denial that it had planted land mines on the South Korean side of the Demilitarized Zone that injured two South Korean soldiers last week. Seoul retaliated for those injuries by restarting the loudspeaker propaganda broadcasts for the first time in 11 years and suggested more actions could follow. The placards read: "North Korea, land mine provocation." (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man, File)

    FILE - In this Aug. 11, 2015, file photo, members of South Korean conservative group shout slogans after burning an effigy of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and North Korean flags during a rally denouncing the North Korea at the Imjingak Pavilion near the border village of Panmunjom in Paju, South Korea. North Korea on Saturday, Aug. 15, 2015, threatened to attack South Korean loudspeakers that are broadcasting anti-Pyongyang propaganda messages across their shared border, the world's most heavily armed. The warning follows Pyongyang's earlier denial that it had planted land mines on the South Korean side of the Demilitarized Zone that injured two South Korean soldiers last week. Seoul retaliated for those injuries by restarting the loudspeaker propaganda broadcasts for the first time in 11 years and suggested more actions could follow. The placards read: "North Korea, land mine provocation." (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man, File)  (The Associated Press)

North Korea is denying that it planted land mines that injured two South Korean soldiers last week and prompted Seoul to restart propaganda broadcasts across the border for the first time in 11 years.

North Korea's powerful National Defense Commission said Friday it "makes no sense" that it buried mines on the southern side of the border because it only uses such devices for defense.

Investigations by Seoul and the U.S.-led U.N. Command blamed Pyongyang for the mines that exploded when soldiers were on a routine patrol near a wire fence in the southern side of the border. One of the soldiers lost both legs while the other lost one leg.

Officials said the mine planting violates the armistice that ended the Korean War.